Browse by Title : J

  • Jacques Lacan and the Other Side of Psychoanalysis
    Author(s): Clemens, Justin; Grigg, Russell; Miller, Jacques-Alain; Verhaeghe, Paul; Ragland, Ellie
    Abstract:

    This collection is the first extended interrogation in any language of Jacques Lacan's Seminar XVII. Originally delivered just after the Paris uprisings of May 1968, Seminar XVII marked a turning point in Lacan’s thought; it was both a step forward in the psychoanalytic debates and an important contribution to social and political issues. Collecting important analyses by many of the major Lacanian theorists and practitioners, this anthology is at once an introduction, critique, and extension of Lacan’s influential ideas.

    The contributors examine Lacan’s theory of the four discourses, his critique of the Oedipus complex and the superego, the role of primal affects in political life, and his prophetic grasp of twenty-first-century developments. They take up these issues in detail, illuminating the Lacanian concepts with in-depth discussions of shame and guilt, literature and intimacy, femininity, perversion, authority and revolt, and the discourse of marketing and political rhetoric. Topics of more specific psychoanalytic interest include the role of objet a, philosophy and psychoanalysis, the status of knowledge, and the relation between psychoanalytic practices and the modern university.

    Contributors. Geoff Boucher, Marie-Hélène Brousse, Justin Clemens, Mladen Dolar, Oliver Feltham, Russell Grigg, Pierre-Gilles Guéguen, Dominique Hecq, Dominiek Hoens, Éric Laurent, Juliet Flower MacCannell, Jacques-Alain Miller, Ellie Ragland, Matthew Sharpe, Paul Verhaeghe, Slavoj Žižek, Alenka Zupancic

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822387602
    Publication Date: 2006-05-02
    author-list-text: Jacques-Alain Miller, Paul Verhaeghe and Ellie Ragland
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Jacques-Alain Miller,
    2. Paul Verhaeghe and
    3. Ellie Ragland
    contrib-editor: Justin Clemens; Russell Grigg
    contrib-other: Jacques-Alain Miller; Paul Verhaeghe; Ellie Ragland
    copyright-year: 2006
    eisbn: 9780822387602
    isbn-cloth: 9780822337072
    isbn-paper: 9780822337195
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: [sic] Series
    short-abstract:

    Articles by noted Lacanian psychoanalysts and scholars discussing issues that emerge in Lacan's Seminar XVII (newly translated) that import fields of psychoanalysis, philosophy, political theory, cultural studies and literary studies.

    subtitle: Reflections on Seminar XVII, sic vi
  • Jacques Rancière
    Author(s): Rockhill, Gabriel; Watts, Philip; Ross, Kristin; Badiou, Alain
    Abstract:

    The French philosopher Jacques Rancière has influenced disciplines from history and philosophy to political theory, literature, art history, and film studies. His research into nineteenth-century workers’ archives, reflections on political equality, critique of the traditional division between intellectual and manual labor, and analysis of the place of literature, film, and art in modern society have all constituted major contributions to contemporary thought. In this collection, leading scholars in the fields of philosophy, literary theory, and cultural criticism engage Rancière’s work, illuminating its originality, breadth, and rigor, as well as its place in current debates. They also explore the relationships between Rancière and the various authors and artists he has analyzed, ranging from Plato and Aristotle to Flaubert, Rossellini, Auerbach, Bourdieu, and Deleuze.

    The contributors to this collection do not simply elucidate Rancière’s project; they also critically respond to it from their own perspectives. They consider the theorist’s engagement with the writing of history, with institutional and narrative constructions of time, and with the ways that individuals and communities can disturb or reconfigure what he has called the “distribution of the sensible.” They examine his unique conception of politics as the disruption of the established distribution of bodies and roles in the social order, and they elucidate his novel account of the relationship between aesthetics and politics by exploring his astute analyses of literature and the visual arts. In the collection’s final essay, Rancière addresses some of the questions raised by the other contributors and returns to his early work to provide a retrospective account of the fundamental stakes of his project.

    Contributors. Alain Badiou, Étienne Balibar, Bruno Bosteels, Yves Citton, Tom Conley, Solange Guénoun, Peter Hallward, Todd May, Eric Méchoulan, Giuseppina Mecchia, Jean-Luc Nancy, Andrew Parker, Jacques Rancière, Gabriel Rockhill, Kristin Ross, James Swenson, Rajeshwari Vallury, Philip Watts

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822390930
    Publication Date: 2009-07-31
    author-list-text: Kristin Ross and Alain Badiou
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Kristin Ross and
    2. Alain Badiou
    contrib-editor: Gabriel Rockhill; Philip Watts
    contrib-other: Kristin Ross; Alain Badiou
    copyright-year: 2009
    eisbn: 9780822390930
    isbn-cloth: 9780822344933
    isbn-paper: 9780822345060
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: e-Duke books scholarly collection.
    short-abstract:

    Collection that examines the work of cultural and political theorist Jacques Rancière.

    subtitle: History, Politics, Aesthetics
  • James Baldwin’s Turkish Decade
    Author(s): Zaborowska, Magdalena J.
    Abstract:

    Between 1961 and 1971 James Baldwin spent extended periods of time in Turkey, where he worked on some of his most important books. In this first in-depth exploration of Baldwin’s “Turkish decade,” Magdalena J. Zaborowska reveals the significant role that Turkish locales, cultures, and friends played in Baldwin’s life and thought. Turkey was a nurturing space for the author, who by 1961 had spent nearly ten years in France and Western Europe and failed to reestablish permanent residency in the United States. Zaborowska demonstrates how Baldwin’s Turkish sojourns enabled him to re-imagine himself as a black queer writer and to revise his views of American identity and U.S. race relations as the 1960s drew to a close.

    Following Baldwin’s footsteps through Istanbul, Ankara, and Bodrum, Zaborowska presents many never published photographs, new information from Turkish archives, and original interviews with Turkish artists and intellectuals who knew Baldwin and collaborated with him on a play that he directed in 1969. She analyzes the effect of his experiences on his novel Another Country (1962) and on two volumes of his essays, The Fire Next Time (1963) and No Name in the Street (1972), and she explains how Baldwin’s time in Turkey informed his ambivalent relationship to New York, his responses to the American South, and his decision to settle in southern France. James Baldwin’s Turkish Decade expands the knowledge of Baldwin’s role as a transnational African American intellectual, casts new light on his later works, and suggests ways of reassessing his earlier writing in relation to ideas of exile and migration.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822392408
    Publication Date: 2008-12-26
    author-list-text: Magdalena J. Zaborowska
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Magdalena J. Zaborowska
    contrib-author: Magdalena J. Zaborowska
    copyright-year: 2008
    eisbn: 9780822392408
    illustrations-note: 53 illustrations, 2 maps
    isbn-cloth: 9780822341444
    isbn-paper: 9780822341673
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: e-Duke books scholarly collection.
    short-abstract:

    Shows that the decade Baldwin spent in Turkey is crucial to evaluating his contribution to American letters, especially to understanding the interdependence of race and the erotic in constructions of American identity.

    subtitle: Erotics of Exile
  • Jameson on Jameson
    Author(s): Jameson, Fredric; Buchanan, Ian; Fish, Stanley
    Abstract:

    Fredric Jameson is one of the most influential literary and cultural critics writing today. He is a theoretical innovator whose ideas about the intersections of politics and culture have reshaped the critical landscape across the humanities and social sciences. Bringing together ten interviews conducted between 1982 and 2005, Jameson on Jameson is a compellingly candid introduction to his thought for those new to it, and a rich source of illumination and clarification for those seeking deeper understanding. Jameson discusses his intellectual and political preoccupations, most prominently his commitment to Marxism as a way of critiquing capitalism and the culture it has engendered. He explains many of his key concepts, including postmodernism, the dialectic, metacommentary, the political unconscious, the utopian, cognitive mapping, and spatialization.

    Jameson on Jameson displays Jameson’s extraordinary grasp of contemporary culture—architecture, art, cinema, literature, philosophy, politics, psychoanalysis, and urban geography—as well as the challenge that the geographic reach of his thinking poses to the Eurocentricity of the West. Conducted by accomplished scholars from United States, Egypt, Korea, China, Sweden, and England, the interviews elicit Jameson’s reflections on the broad international significance of his ideas and their applicability and implications in different cultural and political contexts, including the present phase of globalization.

    The volume includes an introduction by Jameson and a comprehensive bibliography of his publications in all languages.

    Interviewers

    Mona Abousenna

    Abbas Al-Tonsi

    Srinivas Aravamudan

    Jonathan Culler

    Sara Danius

    Leonard Green

    Sabry Hafez

    Stuart Hall

    Stefan Jonsson

    Ranjana Khanna

    Richard Klein

    Horacio Machin

    Paik Nak-chung

    Michael Speaks

    Anders Stephanson

    Xudong Zhang

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822390176
    Publication Date: 2007-12-05
    author-list-text: Fredric Jameson and Stanley Fish
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Fredric Jameson and
    2. Stanley Fish
    contrib-author: Fredric Jameson
    contrib-editor: Ian Buchanan
    contrib-series-editor: Stanley Fish
    copyright-year: 2007
    eisbn: 9780822390176
    isbn-cloth: 9780822340874
    isbn-paper: 9780822341093
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Post-Contemporary Interventions
    short-abstract:

    A collection of interviews with Fredric Jameson over a 20 year period.

    subtitle: Conversations on Cultural Marxism
  • Janus's Gaze
    Author(s): Galli, Carlo; Sitze, Adam; Minervini, Amanda
    Abstract:

    First published in Italian in 2008 and appearing here in English for the first time, Janus's Gaze is the culmination of Carlo Galli's ongoing critique of the work of Carl Schmitt. Galli argues that Schmitt's main accomplishment, as well as the thread that unifies his oeuvre, is his construction of a genealogy of the modern that explains how modernity's compulsory drive to achieve order is both necessary and impossible. Galli addresses five key problems in Schmitt's thought: his relation to the state, the significance of his concept of political theology, his readings of Machiavelli and Spinoza, his relation to Leo Strauss, and his relevance for contemporary political theory. Galli emphasizes the importance of passing through Schmitt’s thought—and, more important, beyond Schmitt’s thought—if we are to achieve insight into the problems of the global age. Adam Sitze provides an illuminating introduction to Schmitt and Galli's reading of him.

     

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822374855
    Publication Date: 2015-11-02
    author-list-text: Carlo Galli and Amanda Minervini
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Carlo Galli and
    2. Amanda Minervini
    contrib-author: Carlo Galli
    contrib-editor: Adam Sitze
    contrib-translator: Amanda Minervini
    copyright-year: 2015
    eisbn: 9780822374855
    isbn-cloth: 9780822360186
    isbn-paper: 9780822360322
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Appearing here in English for the first time, Janus's Gaze is the culmination of Carlo Galli's ongoing critique of the work of Carl Schmitt where he finds the unifying thread of Schmitt's work to be his creation of the genealogy of modernity.

    subtitle: Essays on Carl Schmitt
  • Japan After Japan
    Author(s): Yoda, Tomiko; Harootunian, Harry; Chow, Rey; Miyoshi, Masao
    Abstract:

    The prolonged downturn in the Japanese economy that began during the recessionary 1990s triggered a complex set of reactions both within Japan and abroad, reshaping not only the country’s economy but also its politics, society, and culture. In Japan After Japan, scholars of history, anthropology, literature, and film explore the profound transformations in Japan since the early 1990s, providing complex analyses of a nation in transition, linking its present to its past and connecting local situations to global developments.

    Several of the essayists reflect on the politics of history, considering changes in the relationship between Japan and the United States, the complex legacy of Japanese colonialism, Japan’s chronic unease with its wartime history, and the postwar consolidation of an ethnocentric and racist nationalism. Others analyze anxieties related to the role of children in society and the weakening of the gendered divide between workplace and home. Turning to popular culture, contributors scrutinize the avid consumption of “real events” in formats including police shows, quiz shows, and live Web camera feeds; the creation, distribution, and reception of Pokémon, the game-based franchise that became a worldwide cultural phenomenon; and the ways that the behavior of zealous fans of anime both reinforces and clashes with corporate interests. Focusing on contemporary social and political movements, one essay relates how a local citizens’ group pressed the Japanese government to turn an international exposition, the Aichi Expo 2005, into a more environmentally conscious project. Another essay offers both a survey of emerging political movements and a manifesto identifying new possibilities for radical politics in Japan. Together the contributors to Japan After Japan present much-needed insight into the wide-ranging transformations of Japanese society that began in the 1990s.

    Contributors. Anne Allison, Andrea G. Arai, Eric Cazdyn, Leo Ching, Harry Harootunian, Marilyn Ivy, Sabu Kohso, J. Victor Koschmann, Thomas LaMarre, Masao Miyoshi, Yutaka Nagahara, Naoki Sakai, Tomiko Yoda, Yoshimi Shunya, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822388609
    Publication Date: 2006-09-13
    author-list-text: Rey Chow and Masao Miyoshi
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Rey Chow and
    2. Masao Miyoshi
    contrib-editor: Tomiko Yoda; Harry Harootunian
    contrib-series-editor: Rey Chow; Masao Miyoshi
    copyright-year: 2006
    eisbn: 9780822388609
    isbn-cloth: 9780822337874
    isbn-paper: 9780822338130
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society
    short-abstract:

    Scholars of history, anthropology, literature, and film explore the transformations in Japanese politics, culture, and society since Japan s recession of the early 1990s.

    subtitle: Social and Cultural Life from the Recessionary 1990s to the Present
  • Japan in the World
    Author(s): Miyoshi, Masao; Harootunian, Harry; Najita, Tetsuo; Anderson, Perry
    Abstract:

    Since the end of World War II, Japan has determinately remained outside the current of world events and uninvolved in the processes determining global history and politics. In Japan and the World, distinguished scholars, novelists, and intellectuals articulate how Japan—despite unprecedented economic prowess in securing dominance in the world's market—is caught in a complex dependency with the United States. Drawing on critical and postmodernist theory, this timely volume situates this dependency in a broader historical context and assesses Japan's current dealings in international politics, society, and culture.

    Among the many topics covered are: racism in U.S.-Japanese relations; productivity and workplace discourse; Western cultural hegemony; the constructing of a Japanese cultural history; and the place of the novelist in today's world. Originally published as a special issue of boundary 2 (Fall 1991), this edition includes four new essays on Japanese industrial revolution; the place of English studies in Japan; how American cultural, historical, and political discourse represented Japan and in turn how America's version of Japan became Japan's version of itself; and an "archaeology" of hegemonic relationships between Japan and America and Britain in the first half of the twentieth century.

    Contributors. Eqbal Ahmad, Perry Anderson, Bruce Cumings, Arif Dirlik, H.D. Harootunian, Kazuo Ishuro, Fredric Jameson, Kojin Karatani, Oe Kenzaburo, Masao Miyoshi, Tetsuo Najita, Leslie Pincus, Naoki Sakai, Miriam Silverberg, Christena Turner, Rob Wilson, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822381808
    Publication Date: 1993-06-29
    author-list-text: Tetsuo Najita and Perry Anderson
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Tetsuo Najita and
    2. Perry Anderson
    contrib-editor: Masao Miyoshi; Harry Harootunian
    contrib-other: Tetsuo Najita; Perry Anderson
    copyright-year: 1993
    eisbn: 9780822381808
    isbn-cloth: 9780822313502
    isbn-paper: 9780822313687
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Since the end of World War II, Japan has determinately remained outside the current of world events and uninvolved in the processes determining global history and politics. In Japan and the World, distinguished scholars, novelists, and intellectuals articulate how Japan—despite unprecedented economic prowess in securing dominance in the world's market—is caught in a complex dependency with the United States. Drawing on critical and postmodernist theory, this timely volume situates this dependency in a broader historical context and assesses Japan's current dealings in international politics, society, and culture.

    Among the many topics covered are: racism in U.S.-Japanese relations; productivity and workplace discourse; Western cultural hegemony; the constructing of a Japanese cultural history; and the place of the novelist in today's world. Originally published as a special issue of boundary 2 (Fall 1991), this edition includes four new essays on Japanese industrial revolution; the place of English studies in Japan; how American cultural, historical, and political discourse represented Japan and in turn how America's version of Japan became Japan's version of itself; and an "archaeology" of hegemonic relationships between Japan and America and Britain in the first half of the twentieth century.

    Contributors. Eqbal Ahmad, Perry Anderson, Bruce Cumings, Arif Dirlik, H.D. Harootunian, Kazuo Ishuro, Fredric Jameson, Kojin Karatani, Oe Kenzaburo, Masao Miyoshi, Tetsuo Najita, Leslie Pincus, Naoki Sakai, Miriam Silverberg, Christena Turner, Rob Wilson, Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto

    subtitle:
  • Japanoise
    Author(s): Novak, David
    Abstract:

    Noise, an underground music made through an amalgam of feedback, distortion, and electronic effects, first emerged as a genre in the 1980s, circulating on cassette tapes traded between fans in Japan, Europe, and North America. With its cultivated obscurity, ear-shattering sound, and over-the-top performances, Noise has captured the imagination of a small but passionate transnational audience.

    For its scattered listeners, Noise always seems to be new and to come from somewhere else: in North America, it was called "Japanoise." But does Noise really belong to Japan? Is it even music at all? And why has Noise become such a compelling metaphor for the complexities of globalization and participatory media at the turn of the millennium?

    In Japanoise, David Novak draws on more than a decade of research in Japan and the United States to trace the "cultural feedback" that generates and sustains Noise. He provides a rich ethnographic account of live performances, the circulation of recordings, and the lives and creative practices of musicians and listeners. He explores the technologies of Noise and the productive distortions of its networks. Capturing the textures of feedback—its sonic and cultural layers and vibrations—Novak describes musical circulation through sound and listening, recording and performance, international exchange, and the social interpretations of media.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822397540
    Publication Date: 2013-05-13
    author-list-text: David Novak
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. David Novak
    contrib-author: David Novak
    copyright-year: 2013
    eisbn: 9780822397540
    illustrations-note: 51 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822353799
    isbn-paper: 9780822353928
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Sign, Storage, Transmission
    short-abstract:

    Drawing on more than a decade of research in Japan and the United States, David Novak traces the "cultural feedback" that generates and sustains Noise, an underground music genre combining distortion and electronic effects.

    subtitle: Music at the Edge of Circulation
  • Japan’s Holy War
    Author(s): Skya, Walter; Chow, Rey; Harootunian, Harry; Miyoshi, Masao
    Abstract:

    Japan’s Holy War reveals how a radical religious ideology drove the Japanese to imperial expansion and global war. Bringing to light a wealth of new information, Walter A. Skya demonstrates that whatever other motives the Japanese had for waging war in Asia and the Pacific, for many the war was the fulfillment of a religious mandate. In the early twentieth century, a fervent nationalism developed within State Shintō. This ultranationalism gained widespread military and public support and led to rampant terrorism; between 1921 and 1936 three serving and two former prime ministers were assassinated. Shintō ultranationalist societies fomented a discourse calling for the abolition of parliamentary government and unlimited Japanese expansion.

    Skya documents a transformation in the ideology of State Shintō in the late nineteenth century and the early twentieth. He shows that within the religion, support for the German-inspired theory of constitutional monarchy that had underpinned the Meiji Constitution gave way to a theory of absolute monarchy advocated by the constitutional scholar Hozumi Yatsuka in the late 1890s. That, in turn, was superseded by a totalitarian ideology centered on the emperor: an ideology advanced by the political theorists Uesugi Shinkichi and Kakehi Katsuhiko in the 1910s and 1920s. Examining the connections between various forms of Shintō nationalism and the state, Skya demonstrates that where the Meiji oligarchs had constructed a quasi-religious, quasi-secular state, Hozumi Yatsuka desired a traditional theocratic state. Uesugi Shinkichi and Kakehi Katsuhiko went further, encouraging radical, militant forms of extreme religious nationalism. Skya suggests that the creeping democracy and secularization of Japan’s political order in the early twentieth century were the principal causes of the terrorism of the 1930s, which ultimately led to a holy war against Western civilization.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822392460
    Publication Date: 2009-03-13
    author-list-text: Walter Skya, Rey Chow, Harry Harootunian and Masao Miyoshi
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Walter Skya,
    2. Rey Chow,
    3. Harry Harootunian and
    4. Masao Miyoshi
    contrib-author: Walter Skya
    contrib-series-editor: Rey Chow; Harry Harootunian; Masao Miyoshi
    copyright-year: 2009
    eisbn: 9780822392460
    illustrations-note: 1 figure
    isbn-cloth: 9780822344254
    isbn-paper: 9780822344230
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society
    short-abstract:

    A work of history documenting the late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century transformation of State Shinto into a radical ideology that ultimately drove Japan into a holy war against Western civilization.

    subtitle: The Ideology of Radical Shinto Ultranationalism
  • Jazz Among the Discourses
    Author(s): Gabbard, Krin
    Abstract:

    The study of jazz comes of age with this anthology. One of the first books to consider jazz outside of established critical modes, Jazz Among the Discourses brings together scholars from an array of disciplines to question and revise conventional methods of writing and thinking about jazz.

    Challenging "official jazz histories," the contributors to this volume view jazz through the lenses of comparative literature; African American studies; music, film, and communication theory; English literature; American studies; history; and philosophy. With uncommon rigor and imagination, their essays probe the influence of various discourses—journalism, scholarship, politics, oral history, and entertainment—on writing about jazz. Employing modes of criticism and theory that have transformed study in the humanities, they address questions seldom if ever raised in jazz writing: What are the implications of building jazz history around the medium of the phonograph record? Why did jazz writers first make the claim that jazz is an art? How is an African American aesthetic articulated through the music? What are the consequences of the interaction between the critic and the jazz artist? How does the improvising artist navigate between chaos and discipline?

    Along with its companion volume, Representing Jazz, this versatile anthology marks the arrival of jazz studies as a mature, intellectually independent discipline. Its rethinking of conventional jazz discourse will further strengthen the position of jazz studies within the academy.

    Contributors. John Corbett, Steven B. Elworth, Krin Gabbard, Bernard Gendron, William Howland Kenney, Eric Lott, Nathaniel Mackey, Burton Peretti, Ronald M. Radano, Jed Rasula, Lorenzo Thomas, Robert Walser

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822397083
    Publication Date: 2012-06-01
    contrib-editor: Krin Gabbard
    copyright-year: 1995
    eisbn: 9780822397083
    illustrations-note: 7 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822315810
    isbn-paper: 9780822315964
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    subtitle:
  • Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra
    Author(s): Feld, Steven
    Abstract:

    In this remarkable book, Steven Feld, pioneer of the anthropology of sound, listens to the vernacular cosmopolitanism of jazz players in Ghana. Some have traveled widely, played with American jazz greats, and blended the innovations of John Coltrane with local instruments and worldviews. Combining memoir, biography, ethnography, and history, Feld conveys a diasporic intimacy and dialogue that contests American nationalist and Afrocentric narratives of jazz history. His stories of Accra's jazz cosmopolitanism feature Ghanaba/Guy Warren (1923–2008), the eccentric drummer who befriended the likes of Charlie Parker, Max Roach, and Thelonious Monk in the United States in the 1950s, only to return, embittered, to Ghana, where he became the country's leading experimentalist. Others whose stories figure prominently are Nii Noi Nortey, who fuses the legacies of the black avant-gardes of the 1960s and 1970s with pan-African philosophy in sculptural shrines to Coltrane and musical improvisations inspired by his work; the percussionist Nii Otoo Annan, a traditional master inspired by Coltrane's drummers Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali; and a union of Accra truck and minibus drivers whose squeeze-bulb honk-horn music for drivers' funerals recalls the jazz funerals of New Orleans. Feld describes these artists' cosmopolitan outlook as an "acoustemology," a way of knowing the world through sound.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822394969
    Publication Date: 2012-03-09
    author-list-text: Steven Feld
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Steven Feld
    contrib-author: Steven Feld
    copyright-year: 2012
    eisbn: 9780822394969
    illustrations-note: 78 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822351481
    isbn-paper: 9780822351627
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    The distinguished scholar Steven Feld shaped the field of the anthropology of sound and music. In this new work, he looks at the vernacular cosmopolitanism of a group of jazz players in Ghana, including some who have traveled widely, played with American jazz greats, and blended Coltrane with local instruments and philosophy. He describes their cosmopolitan outlook as an accoustemology, a way of knowing the world through sound. Feld combines memoir, biography, ethnography, and history, telling a story of diasporic intimacy and dialogue that contests both American nationalist and Afrocentric narrations of jazz history.

    subtitle: Five Musical Years in Ghana
  • Johannesburg
    Author(s): Nuttall, Sarah; Mbembe, Achille; Simone, AbdouMaliq
    Abstract:

    Johannesburg: The Elusive Metropolis is a pioneering effort to insert South Africa’s largest city into urban theory, on its own terms. Johannesburg is Africa’s premier metropolis. Yet theories of urbanization have cast it as an emblem of irresolvable crisis, the spatial embodiment of unequal economic relations and segregationist policies, and a city that responds to but does not contribute to modernity on the global scale. Complicating and contesting such characterizations, the contributors to this collection reassess classic theories of metropolitan modernity as they explore the experience of “city-ness” and urban life in post-apartheid South Africa. They portray Johannesburg as a polycentric and international city with a hybrid history that continually permeates the present. Turning its back on rigid rationalities of planning and racial separation, Johannesburg has become a place of intermingling and improvisation, a city that is fast developing its own brand of cosmopolitan culture.

    The volume’s essays include an investigation of representation and self-stylization in the city, an ethnographic examination of friction zones and practices of social reproduction in inner-city Johannesburg, and a discussion of the economic and literary relationship between Johannesburg and Maputo, Mozambique’s capital. One contributor considers how Johannesburg’s cosmopolitan sociability enabled the anticolonial projects of Mohandas Ghandi and Nelson Mandela. Journalists, artists, architects, writers, and scholars bring contemporary Johannesburg to life in ten short pieces, including reflections on music and megamalls, nightlife, built spaces, and life for foreigners in the city.

    Contributors: Arjun Appadurai, Carol A. Breckenridge, Lindsay Bremner, David Bunn, Fred de Vries, Nsizwa Dlamini, Mark Gevisser, Stefan Helgesson, Julia Hornberger, Jonathan Hyslop, Grace Khunou, Frédéric Le Marcis, Xavier Livermon, John Matshikiza, Achille Mbembe, Robert Muponde, Sarah Nuttall, Tom Odhiambo, Achal Prabhala, AbdouMaliq Simone

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822381211
    Publication Date: 2008-10-03
    author-list-text: AbdouMaliq Simone
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. AbdouMaliq Simone
    contrib-editor: Sarah Nuttall; Achille Mbembe
    contrib-other: AbdouMaliq Simone
    copyright-year: 2008
    eisbn: 9780822381211
    illustrations-note: 24 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822342625
    isbn-paper: 9780822342847
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: a Public Culture Book
    short-abstract:

    Collection of scholarly and creative essays on Johannesburg that focus on the city's modern and cosmopolitan status within Africa and the world.

    subtitle: The Elusive Metropolis
  • Joyce’s Book of Memory
    Author(s): Rickard, John S.
    Abstract:

    For James Joyce, perhaps the most crucial of all human faculties was memory. It represented both the central thread of identity and a looking glass into the past. It served as an avenue into other minds, an essential part of the process of literary composition and narration, and the connective tissue of cultural tradition. In Joyce’s Book of Memory John S. Rickard demonstrates how Joyce’s body of work—Ulysses in particular—operates as a “mnemotechnic,” a technique for preserving and remembering personal, social, and cultural pasts.

    Offering a detailed reading of Joyce and his methods of writing, Rickard investigates the uses of memory in Ulysses and analyzes its role in the formation of personal identity. The importance of forgetting and repression, and the deadliness of nostalgia and habit in Joyce’s paralyzed Dublin are also revealed. Noting the power of spontaneous, involuntary recollection, Rickard locates Joyce’s mnemotechnic within its historical and philosophical contexts. As he examines how Joyce responded to competing intellectual paradigms, Rickard explores Ulysses’ connection to medieval, modern, and (what would become) postmodern worldviews, as well as its display of tensions between notions of subjective and universal memory. Finally, Joyce’s Book of Memory illustrates how Joyce distilled subjectivity, history, and cultural identity into a text that offers a panoramic view of the modern period.

    This book will interest students and scholars of Joyce, as well as others engaged in the study of modern and postmodern literature.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822382768
    Publication Date: 1998-12-16
    author-list-text: John S. Rickard
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. John S. Rickard
    contrib-author: John S. Rickard
    copyright-year: 1999
    eisbn: 9780822382768
    isbn-cloth: 9780822321583
    isbn-paper: 9780822321705
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Discusses Ulysses arguing that through the operation of memory, it mimics the working of the human mind and achieves its status as one of the most intellectual achievements of the 20th century.

    subtitle: The Mnemotechnic of Ulysses
  • Juan Gregorio Palechor
    Author(s): Jimeno, Myriam; Klatt, Andy
    Abstract:

    The Colombian activist Juan Gregorio Palechor (1923–1992) dedicated his life to championing indigenous rights in Cauca, a department in the southwest of Colombia, where he helped found the Regional Indigenous Council of Cauca. Recounting his life story in collaboration with the Colombian anthropologist Myriam Jimeno, Palechor traces his political awakening, his experiences in national politics, the disillusionment that resulted, and his turn to a more radical activism aimed at confronting ethnic discrimination and fighting for indigenous territorial and political sovereignty.

    Palechor's lively memoir is complemented by Jimeno's reflections on autobiography as an anthropological tool and on the oppressive social and political conditions faced by Colombia's indigenous peoples. A faithful and fluent transcription of Palechor's life story, this work is a uniquely valuable resource for understanding the contemporary indigenous rights movements in Colombia.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822377351
    Publication Date: 2014-02-10
    author-list-text: Myriam Jimeno and Andy Klatt
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Myriam Jimeno and
    2. Andy Klatt
    contrib-author: Myriam Jimeno
    contrib-translator: Andy Klatt
    copyright-year: 2014
    eisbn: 9780822377351
    illustrations-note: 30 photographs, 1 map, 1 figure
    isbn-cloth: 9780822355229
    isbn-paper: 9780822355373
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Narrating Native Histories
    subtitle: The Story of My Life
  • Juan Soldado
    Author(s): Vanderwood, Paul J; Joseph, Gilbert M.; Rosenberg, Emily S.
    Abstract:

    Paul J. Vanderwood offers a fascinating look at the events, beliefs, and circumstances that have motivated popular devotion to Juan Soldado, a Mexican folk saint. In his mortal incarnation, Juan Soldado was Juan Castillo Morales, a twenty-four-year-old soldier convicted of and quickly executed for the rape and murder of eight-year-old Olga Camacho in Tijuana in 1938. Immediately after Morales’s death, many people began to doubt the evidence of his guilt, or at least the justice of his brutal execution. People reported seeing blood seeping from his grave and hearing his soul cry out protesting his innocence. Soon the “martyred” Morales was known as Juan Soldado, or John the Soldier. Believing that those who have died unjustly sit closest to God, people began visiting Morales’s grave asking for favors. Within months of his death, the young soldier had become a popular saint. He is not recognized by the Catholic Church, yet thousands of people have made pilgrimages to his gravesite. While Juan Soldado is well known in Tijuana, southern California’s Mexican American community, and beyond, this book is the first to situate his story within a broader exploration of how and why popular canonizations such as his take root and flourish.

    In addition to conducting extensive archival research, Vanderwood interviewed central actors in the events of 1938, including Olga Camacho’s mother, citizens who rioted to demand Morales’s release to a lynch mob, those who witnessed his execution, and some of the earliest believers in his miraculous powers. Vanderwood also interviewed many present-day visitors to the shrine at Morales’s grave. He describes them, their petitions—for favors such as health, a good marriage, or safe passage into the United States—and how they reconcile their belief in Juan Soldado with their Catholicism. Vanderwood puts the events of 1938 within the context of Depression-era Tijuana and he locates people’s devotion, then and now, within the history of extra-institutional religious activity. In Juan Soldado, a gripping true-crime mystery opens up into a much larger and more elusive mystery of faith and belief.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822386339
    Publication Date: 2004-10-11
    author-list-text: Paul J Vanderwood, Gilbert M. Joseph and Emily S. Rosenberg
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Paul J Vanderwood,
    2. Gilbert M. Joseph and
    3. Emily S. Rosenberg
    contrib-author: Paul J Vanderwood
    contrib-series-editor: Gilbert M. Joseph; Emily S. Rosenberg
    copyright-year: 2004
    eisbn: 9780822386339
    illustrations-note: 39 b&w photos, 5 maps
    isbn-cloth: 9780822334040
    isbn-paper: 9780822334156
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: American Encounters/Global Interactions
    short-abstract:

    Investigates the popular canonization of a saint in Tijuana, asking what triggered the devotion and considering local, national, international, geographical, environmental, cultural, and psychological aspects of the event.

    subtitle: Rapist, Murderer, Martyr, Saint
  • Julia Child’s The French Chef
    Author(s): Polan, Dana
    Abstract:

    Julia Child’s TV show, The French Chef, was extraordinarily popular during its broadcast from 1963 until 1973. Child became a cultural icon in the 1960s, and, in the years since, she and her show have remained enduring influences on American cooking, American television, and American culture. In this concise book, Dana Polan considers what made Child’s program such a success. It was not the first televised cooking show, but it did define and popularize the genre. Polan examines the development of the show, its day-to-day production, and its critical and fan reception. He argues that The French Chef changed the conventions of television’s culinary culture by rendering personality indispensable. Child was energetic and enthusiastic, and her cooking lessons were never just about food preparation, although she was an effective and unpretentious instructor. They were also about social mobility, the discovery of foreign culture, and a personal enjoyment and fulfillment that promised to transcend domestic drudgery. Polan situates Julia Child and The French Chef in their historical and cultural moment, while never losing sight of Child’s unique personality and captivating on-air presence.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822393474
    Publication Date: 2011-07-22
    author-list-text: Dana Polan
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Dana Polan
    contrib-author: Dana Polan
    copyright-year: 2011
    eisbn: 9780822393474
    illustrations-note: 34 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822348597
    isbn-paper: 9780822348726
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Spin offs
    short-abstract:

    Dana Polan considers what made Julia Child s TV show, The French Chef, so popular during its original broadcast and such enduring influences on American cooking, American television, and American culture since then.

    subtitle:
  • Jungle Laboratories
    Author(s): Soto Laveaga, Gabriela
    Abstract:

    In the 1940s chemists discovered that barbasco, a wild yam indigenous to Mexico, could be used to mass-produce synthetic steroid hormones. Barbasco spurred the development of new drugs, including cortisone and the first viable oral contraceptives, and positioned Mexico as a major player in the global pharmaceutical industry. Yet few people today are aware of Mexico’s role in achieving these advances in modern medicine. In Jungle Laboratories, Gabriela Soto Laveaga reconstructs the story of how rural yam pickers, international pharmaceutical companies, and the Mexican state collaborated and collided over the barbasco. By so doing, she sheds important light on a crucial period in Mexican history and challenges us to reconsider who can produce science.

    Soto Laveaga traces the political, economic, and scientific development of the global barbasco industry from its emergence in the 1940s, through its appropriation by a populist Mexican state in 1970, to its obsolescence in the mid-1990s. She focuses primarily on the rural southern region of Tuxtepec, Oaxaca, where the yam grew most freely and where scientists relied on local, indigenous knowledge to cultivate and harvest the plant. Rural Mexicans, at first unaware of the pharmaceutical and financial value of barbasco, later acquired and deployed scientific knowledge to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies, lobby the Mexican government, and ultimately transform how urban Mexicans perceived them. By illuminating how the yam made its way from the jungles of Mexico, to domestic and foreign scientific laboratories where it was transformed into pills, to the medicine cabinets of millions of women across the globe, Jungle Laboratories urges us to recognize the ways that Mexican peasants attained social and political legitimacy in the twentieth century, and positions Latin America as a major producer of scientific knowledge.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822391968
    Publication Date: 2009-12-02
    author-list-text: Gabriela Soto Laveaga
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Gabriela Soto Laveaga
    contrib-author: Gabriela Soto Laveaga
    copyright-year: 2009
    eisbn: 9780822391968
    illustrations-note: 26 illustrations, 1 figure
    isbn-cloth: 9780822345879
    isbn-paper: 9780822346050
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Shows how wild yams, once considered useless, briefly became indispensable to the global pharmaceutical industry (as a source of synthetic steroid hormones) and to the peasants who gathered them.

    subtitle: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of the Pill
  • Junot Díaz and the Decolonial Imagination
    Author(s): Hanna, Monica; Harford Vargas, Jennifer; Saldívar, José David
    Abstract:

    The first sustained critical examination of the work of Dominican-American writer Junot Díaz, this interdisciplinary collection considers how Díaz's writing illuminates the world of Latino cultural expression and trans-American and diasporic literary history. Interested in conceptualizing Díaz's decolonial imagination and his radically re-envisioned world, the contributors show how his aesthetic and activist practice reflect a significant shift in American letters toward a hemispheric and planetary culture. They examine the intersections of race, Afro-Latinidad, gender, sexuality, disability, poverty, and power in Díaz's work. Essays in the volume explore issues of narration, language, and humor in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, the racialized constructions of gender and sexuality in Drown and This Is How You Lose Her, and the role of the zombie in the short story "Monstro." Collectively, they situate Díaz’s writing in relation to American and Latin American literary practices and reveal the author’s activist investments. The volume concludes with Paula Moya's interview with Díaz.

    Contributors: Glenda R. Carpio, Arlene Dávila, Lyn Di Iorio, Junot Díaz, Monica Hanna, Jennifer Harford Vargas, Ylce Irizarry, Claudia Milian, Julie Avril Minich, Paula M. L. Moya, Sarah Quesada, José David Saldívar, Ramón Saldívar, Silvio Torres-Saillant, Deborah R. Vargas

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822374763
    Publication Date: 2015-12-18
    contrib-editor: Monica Hanna; Jennifer Harford Vargas; José David Saldívar
    copyright-year: 2016
    eisbn: 9780822374763
    illustrations-note: 2 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822360247
    isbn-paper: 9780822360339
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    This interdisciplinary collection considers how Dominican-American writer Junot Díaz's aesthetic and activist practice reflect an unprecedented maturation of a shift in American letters toward a hemispheric and planetary culture. Career spanning, the essays examine the intersections of race, Afro-Latinidad, gender, sexuality, disability, poverty, and power in Díaz's work.

    subtitle:

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