Browse by Title : F

  • Fables of Power
    Author(s): Patterson, Annabel; Fish, Stanley; Jameson, Fredric
    Abstract:

    In this imaginative and illuminating work, Annabel Patterson traces the origins and meanings of the Aesopian fable, as well as its function in Renaissance culture and subsequently. She shows how the fable worked as a medium of political analysis and communication, especially from or on behalf of the politically powerless.

    Patterson begins with an analysis of the legendary Life of Aesop, its cultural history and philosophical implications, a topic that involves such widely separated figures as La Fontaine, Hegel, and Vygotsky. The myth’s origin is recovered here in the saving myth of Aesop the Ethiopian, black, ugly, who began as a slave but become both free and influential, a source of political wisdom. She then traces the early modern history of the fable from Caxton, Lydgate, and Henryson through the eighteenth century, focusing on such figures as Spenser, Sidney, Lyly, Shakespeare, and Milton, as well as the lesser-known John Ogilby, Sir Roger L’Estrange, and Samuel Croxall.

    Patterson discusses the famous fable of The Belly and the Members, which, because it articulated in symbolic terms some of the most intransigent problems in political philosophy and practice, was still going strong as a symbolic text in the mid-nineteenth century, where it was focused on industrial relations by Karl Marx and by George Eliot against electoral reform.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822382577
    Publication Date: 1991-03-26
    author-list-text: Annabel Patterson, Stanley Fish and Fredric Jameson
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Annabel Patterson,
    2. Stanley Fish and
    3. Fredric Jameson
    contrib-author: Annabel Patterson
    contrib-series-editor: Stanley Fish; Fredric Jameson
    copyright-year: 1991
    eisbn: 9780822382577
    illustrations-note: 8 b&w illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822311065
    isbn-paper: 9780822311188
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Post-Contemporary Interventions
    short-abstract:

    In this imaginative and illuminating work, Annabel Patterson traces the origins and meanings of the Aesopian fable, as well as its function in Renaissance culture and subsequently. She shows how the fable worked as a medium of political analysis and communication, especially from or on behalf of the politically powerless.

    Patterson begins with an analysis of the legendary Life of Aesop, its cultural history and philosophical implications, a topic that involves such widely separated figures as La Fontaine, Hegel, and Vygotsky. The myth’s origin is recovered here in the saving myth of Aesop the Ethiopian, black, ugly, who began as a slave but become both free and influential, a source of political wisdom. She then traces the early modern history of the fable from Caxton, Lydgate, and Henryson through the eighteenth century, focusing on such figures as Spenser, Sidney, Lyly, Shakespeare, and Milton, as well as the lesser-known John Ogilby, Sir Roger L’Estrange, and Samuel Croxall.

    Patterson discusses the famous fable of The Belly and the Members, which, because it articulated in symbolic terms some of the most intransigent problems in political philosophy and practice, was still going strong as a symbolic text in the mid-nineteenth century, where it was focused on industrial relations by Karl Marx and by George Eliot against electoral reform.

    subtitle: Aesopian Writing and Political History
  • Fabricating Women
    Author(s): Crowston, Clare Haru
    Abstract:

    Winner of the 2002 Berkshire Prize, presented by the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians

    Fabricating Women examines the social institution of the seamstresses’ guild in France from the time of Louis XIV to the Revolution. In contrast with previous scholarship on women and gender in the early modern period, Clare Haru Crowston asserts that the rise of the absolute state, with its centralizing and unifying tendencies, could actually increase women’s economic, social, and legal opportunities and allow them to thrive in corporate organizations such as the guild. Yet Crowston also reveals paradoxical consequences of the guild’s success, such as how its growing membership and visibility ultimately fostered an essentialized femininity that was tied to fashion and appearances.

    Situating the seamstresses’ guild as both an economic and political institution, Crowston explores in particular its relationship with the all-male tailors’ guild, which had dominated the clothing fabrication trade in France until women challenged this monopoly during the seventeenth century. Combining archival evidence with visual images, technical literature, philosophical treatises, and fashion journals, she also investigates the techniques the seamstresses used to make and sell clothing, how the garments reflected and shaped modern conceptions of femininity, and guild officials’ interactions with royal and municipal authorities. Finally, by offering a revealing portrait of these women’s private lives—explaining, for instance, how many seamstresses went beyond traditional female boundaries by choosing to remain single and establish their own households—Crowston challenges existing ideas about women’s work and family in early modern Europe.

    Although clothing lay at the heart of French economic production, social distinction, and cultural identity, Fabricating Women is the first book to investigate this immense and archetypal female guild in depth. It will be welcomed by students and scholars of French and European history, women’s and labor history, fashion and technology, and early modern political economy.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822383062
    Publication Date: 2001-11-16
    author-list-text: Clare Haru Crowston
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Clare Haru Crowston
    contrib-author: Clare Haru Crowston
    copyright-year: 2001
    eisbn: 9780822383062
    illustrations-note: 21 photos, 7 graphs, 7 tables
    isbn-cloth: 9780822326625
    isbn-paper: 9780822326663
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    A study of the seamstresses of late 17th and 18th-century France, who developed a quintessentially feminine occupation that became a major factor in the urban economy.

    subtitle: The Seamstresses of Old Regime France, 1675–1791
  • Facing the Planetary
    Author(s): Connolly, William E.
    Abstract:

    In Facing the Planetary William E. Connolly expands his influential work on the politics of pluralization, capitalism, fragility, and secularism to address the complexities of climate change and to complicate notions of the Anthropocene. Focusing on planetary processes—including the ocean conveyor, glacier flows, tectonic plates, and species evolution—he combines a critical understanding of capitalism with an appreciation of how such nonhuman systems periodically change on their own. Drawing upon scientists and intellectuals such as Lynn Margulis, Michael Benton, Alfred North Whitehead, Anna Tsing, Mahatma Gandhi, Wangari Maathai, Pope Francis, Bruno Latour, and Naomi Klein, Connolly focuses on the gap between those regions creating the most climate change and those suffering most from it. He addresses the creative potential of a "politics of swarming" by which people in different regions and social positions coalesce to reshape dominant priorities. He also explores how those displaying spiritual affinities across differences in creed can energize a militant assemblage that is already underway.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822373254
    Publication Date: 2017-01-20
    author-list-text: William E. Connolly
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. William E. Connolly
    contrib-author: William E. Connolly
    copyright-year: 2017
    eisbn: 9780822373254
    isbn-cloth: 9780822363309
    isbn-paper: 9780822363415
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    William E. Connolly expands his influential work on democratic pluralism to confront the perils of climate change by calling on us to deepen our attachment to the planet and to create a worldwide coalition of people from all demographics to contest the forces that prevent us from addressing climate change.

    subtitle: Entangled Humanism and the Politics of Swarming
  • Fado Resounding
    Author(s): Gray, Lila Ellen
    Abstract:

    Fado, Portugal's most celebrated genre of popular music, can be heard in Lisbon clubs, concert halls, tourist sites, and neighborhood bars. Fado sounds traverse the globe, on internationally marketed recordings, as the "soul" of Lisbon. A fadista might sing until her throat hurts, the voice hovering on the break of a sob; in moments of sung beauty listeners sometimes cry. Providing an ethnographic account of Lisbon'sfado scene, Lila Ellen Gray draws on research conducted with amateur fado musicians, fadistas, communities of listeners, poets, fans, and cultural brokers during the first decade of the twenty-first century. She demonstrates the power of music to transform history and place into feeling in a rapidly modernizing nation on Europe's periphery, a country no longer a dictatorship or an imperial power. Gray emphasizes the power of the genre to absorb sounds, memories, histories, and styles and transform them into new narratives of meaning and "soul."

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822378853
    Publication Date: 2013-10-25
    author-list-text: Lila Ellen Gray
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Lila Ellen Gray
    contrib-author: Lila Ellen Gray
    copyright-year: 2013
    eisbn: 9780822378853
    illustrations-note: 22 photographs (incl. 10 in color), 10 figures
    isbn-cloth: 9780822354598
    isbn-paper: 9780822354710
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    This ethnography of fado, Portugal's most celebrated popular music genre, shows how a musical genre can sediment, circulate, and transform affect, sonorously rendering history and place as soulful and feeling as public.

    subtitle: Affective Politics and Urban Life
  • Failing the Future
    Author(s): Kolodny, Annette
    Abstract:

    Both revealing and compelling, Annette Kolodny’s Failing the Future: A Dean Looks at Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century is drawn from the author’s experience as a distinguished teacher, a prize-winning scholar of American literature, a feminist thinker, and an innovative administrator at a major public university. In chapters that range from the changing structure of the American family and its impact on both curriculum and university benefits policies to recommendations for overhauling the culture of decision making on campus, this former Dean of the College of Humanities at the University of Arizona explores the present state of higher education and offers a sobering view of what lies ahead.

    In this volume Kolodny explains the reasons for the financial crisis in higher education today and boldly addresses the challenges that remain ignored, including rising birthrates, changing demographics both on campus and across the country, the accelerating globalization of higher education and advanced research, and the necessity for greater interdisciplinarity in undergraduate education. Moreover, while sensitive to the complex burdens placed on faculty today, Kolodny nonetheless reveals how the professoriate has allowed itself to become vulnerable to public misperceptions and to lampooning by the media.

    Not simply a book about current problems and future challenges, Failing the Future is rich with practical solutions and workable programs for change. Among her many insights, Kolodny offers a thorough defense of the role of tenure and outlines a new set of procedures to ensure its effective implementation; she proposes a structure for an “Antifeminist Intellectual Harassment Policy”; and she provides a checklist of family-sensitive policies universities can offer their staff, faculty, and administrators. Kolodny calls on union leaders, campus communities, policymakers, and the general public to work together in unprecedented partnerships. Her goal, as she states in a closing coda, is to initiate a revitalized conversation about public education.

    This book should be required reading for all those concerned with the future of higher education in this country—from college trustees to graduate students entering the professoriate, from faculty to university administrators, from officers of campus-based unions to education policymakers.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822396703
    Publication Date: 2012-06-01
    author-list-text: Annette Kolodny
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Annette Kolodny
    contrib-author: Annette Kolodny
    copyright-year: 1998
    eisbn: 9780822396703
    isbn-cloth: 9780822321866
    isbn-paper: 9780822324706
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    subtitle: A Dean Looks at Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century
  • Fair Sex, Savage Dreams
    Author(s): Walton, Jean
    Abstract:

    In Fair Sex, Savage Dreams Jean Walton examines the work of early feminist psychoanalytic writing to decipher in it the unacknowledged yet foundational role of race. Focusing on the 1920s and 1930s, a time when white women were actively refashioning Freud’s problematic accounts of sexual subjectivity, Walton rereads in particular the writing of British analysts Joan Riviere and Melanie Klein, modernist poet H.D., the eccentric French analyst Marie Bonaparte, and anthropologist Margaret Mead.

    Charting the fantasies of racial difference in these women’s writings, Walton establishes that race—particularly during this period—was inseparable from accounts of gender and sexuality. While arguing that these women remained notably oblivious to the racial meanings embedded in their own attempts to rearticulate feminine sexuality, Walton uses these very blindspots to understand how race and sex are deeply imbricated in the constitution of subjectivity. Challenging the notion that subjects acquire gender identities in isolation from racial ones, she thus demonstrates how white-centered psychoanalytic theories have formed the basis for more contemporary feminist and queer explorations of fantasy, desire, power, and subjectivity.

    Fair Sex, Savage Dreams will appeal to scholars of psychoanalysis, literary and cinematic modernism, race studies, queer theory, feminist theory, and anthropology.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822380931
    Publication Date: 2001-01-26
    author-list-text: Jean Walton
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Jean Walton
    contrib-author: Jean Walton
    copyright-year: 2001
    eisbn: 9780822380931
    illustrations-note: 21 b&w photographs, 1 table
    isbn-cloth: 9780822326038
    isbn-paper: 9780822326113
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    A groundbreaking examination of racialized subtexts (and the subsequent priviligeng of whiteness) in foundational feminist critiques of psychoanalysis.

    subtitle: Race, Psychoanalysis, Sexual Difference
  • False Promises
    Author(s): Aronowitz, Stanley
    Abstract:

    This classic study of the American working class, originally published in 1973, is now back in print with a new introduction and epilogue by the author. An innovative blend of first-person experience and original scholarship, Aronowitz traces the historical development of the American working class from post-Civil War times and shows why radical movements have failed to overcome the forces that tend to divde groups of workers from one another. The rise of labor unions is analyzed, as well as their decline as a force for social change. Aronowitz’s new introduction situates the book in the context of developments in current scholarship and the epilogue discusses the effects of recent economic and political changes in the American labor movement.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822381730
    Publication Date: 1991-12-27
    author-list-text: Stanley Aronowitz
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Stanley Aronowitz
    contrib-author: Stanley Aronowitz
    copyright-year: 1992
    eisbn: 9780822381730
    isbn-cloth: 9780822311812
    isbn-paper: 9780822311980
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    subtitle: The Shaping of American Working Class Consciousness
  • Familiar Stranger
    Author(s): Hall, Stuart; Schwarz, Bill
    Abstract:

    "Sometimes I feel myself to have been the last colonial." This, in his own words, is the extraordinary story of the life and career of Stuart Hall—how his experiences shaped his intellectual, political, and theoretical work and how he became one of his age's brightest intellectual lights.

    Growing up in a middle-class family in 1930s Kingston, Jamaica, still then a British colony, the young Stuart Hall found himself uncomfortable in his own home. He lived among Kingston's stiflingly respectable brown middle class, who, in their habits and ambitions, measured themselves against the white elite. As colonial rule was challenged, things began to change in Kingston and across the world. In 1951 a Rhodes scholarship took Hall across the Atlantic to Oxford University, where he met young Jamaicans from all walks of life, as well as writers and thinkers from across the Caribbean, including V. S. Naipaul and George Lamming. While at Oxford he met Raymond Williams, Charles Taylor, and other leading intellectuals, with whom he helped found the intellectual and political movement known as the New Left. With the emotional aftershock of colonialism still pulsing through him, Hall faced a new struggle: that of building a home, a life, and an identity in a postwar England so rife with racism that it could barely recognize his humanity.

    With great insight, compassion, and wit, Hall tells the story of his early life, taking readers on a journey through the sights, smells, and streets of 1930s Kingston while reflecting on the thorny politics of 1950s and 1960s Britain. Full of passion and wisdom, Familiar Stranger is the intellectual memoir of one of our greatest minds.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822372936
    Publication Date: 2017-03-16
    author-list-text: Stuart Hall
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Stuart Hall
    contrib-author: Stuart Hall
    contrib-editor: Bill Schwarz
    copyright-year: 2017
    eisbn: 9780822372936
    illustrations-note: 12 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822363873
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Stuart Hall: Selected Writings
    short-abstract:

    With great insight, compassion, and wit Stuart Hall (1932–2014) tells how his experiences—from growing up in colonial Jamaica and attending Oxford to participating in the thorny politics of 1950s and 1960s Britain—shaped his intellectual and political work to become one of his age's brightest intellectual lights.

    subtitle: A Life Between Two Islands
  • Families in War and Peace
    Author(s): Chambers, Sarah C.
    Abstract:

    In Families in War and Peace Sarah C. Chambers places gender analysis and family politics at the center of Chile's struggle for independence and its subsequent state building. Linking the experiences of both prominent and more humble families to Chile's political and legal history, Chambers argues that matters such as marriage, custody, bloodlines, and inheritance were crucial to Chile's transition from colony to nation. She shows how men and women extended their familial roles to mobilize kin networks for political ends, both during and after the Chilean revolution. From the conflict's end in 1823 until the 1850s, the state adopted the rhetoric of paternal responsibility along with patriarchal authority, which became central to the state building process. Chilean authorities, Chambers argues, garnered legitimacy by enacting or enforcing paternalist laws on property restitution, military pensions, and family maintenance allowances, all of which provided for diverse groups of Chileans. By acting as the fathers of the nation, they aimed to reconcile the "greater Chilean family" and form a stable government and society.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822375562
    Publication Date: 2015-04-29
    author-list-text: Sarah C. Chambers
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Sarah C. Chambers
    contrib-author: Sarah C. Chambers
    copyright-year: 2015
    eisbn: 9780822375562
    illustrations-note: 14 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822358985
    isbn-paper: 9780822358831
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Sarah C. Chambers examines the important role that family played in Chile's transition from colony to nation in the early eighteenth century. She shows how family members mobilized family networks for political ends, and argues that the Chilean state enacted paternalist laws to form a stable government and society.

    subtitle: Chile from Colony to Nation
  • Fantasizing the Feminine in Indonesia
    Author(s): Sears, Laurie J.
    Abstract:

    The stories of Indonesian women have often been told by Indonesian men and Dutch men and women. This volume asks how these representations—reproduced, transformed, and circulated in history, ethnography, and literature—have circumscribed feminine behavior in colonial and postcolonial Indonesia. Presenting dialogues between prominent scholars of and from Indonesia and Indonesian women working in professional, activist, religious, and literary domains, the book dissolves essentialist notions of “women” and “Indonesia” that have arisen out of the tensions of empire.

    The contributors examine the ways in which Indonesian women and men are enmeshed in networks of power and then pursue the stories of those who, sometimes at great political risk, challenge these powers. In this juxtaposition of voices and stories, we see how indigenous patriarchal fantasies of feminine behavior merged with Dutch colonial notions of proper wives and mothers to produce the Indonesian government’s present approach to controlling the images and actions of women. Facing the theoretical challenge of building a truly cross-cultural feminist analysis, Fantasizing the Feminine takes us into an ongoing conversation that reveals the contradictions of postcolonial positionings and the fragility of postmodern identities.

    This book will be welcomed by readers with interests in contemporary Indonesian politics and society as well as historians, anthropologists, and other scholars concerned with literature, gender, and cultural studies.

    Contributors. Benedict R. O’G. Anderson, Sita Aripurnami, Jane Monnig Atkinson, Nancy K. Florida, Daniel S. Lev, Dédé Oetomo, Laurie J. Sears, Ann Laura Stoler, Saraswati Sunindyo, Julia I. Suryakusuma, Jean Gelman Taylor, Sylvia Tiwon, Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, Diane L. Wolf

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822396710
    Publication Date: 2012-06-01
    contrib-editor: Laurie J. Sears
    copyright-year: 1996
    eisbn: 9780822396710
    illustrations-note: 17 b&w photographs, 1 map
    isbn-cloth: 9780822316848
    isbn-paper: 9780822316961
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    subtitle:
  • Farm, Shop, Landing
    Author(s): Bruegel, Martin
    Abstract:

    At the turn of the nineteenth century, when the word “capital” first found its way into the vocabulary of mid-Hudson Valley residents, the term irrevocably marked the profound change that had transformed the region from an inward-looking, rural community into a participant in an emerging market economy. In Farm, Shop, Landing Martin Bruegel turns his attention to the daily lives of merchants, artisans, and farmers who lived and worked along the Hudson River in the decades following the American Revolution to explain how the seeds of capitalism were spread on rural U.S. soil.

    Combining theoretical rigor with extensive archival research, Bruegel’s account diverges from other historiographies of nineteenth-century economic development. It challenges the assumption that the coexistence of long-distance trade, private property, and entrepreneurial activity lead to one inescapable outcome: a market economy either wholeheartedly embraced or entirely rejected by its members. When Bruegel tells the story of farmer William Coventry struggling in the face of bad harvests, widow Mary Livingston battling her tenants, blacksmith Samuel Fowks perfecting the cast-iron plough, and Hannah Bushnell sending her butter to market, Bruegel shows that the social conventions of a particular community, and the real struggles and hopes of individuals, actively mold the evolving economic order. Ultimately, then, Farm, Shop, Landing suggests that the process of modernization must be understood as the result of the simultaneous and often contentious interplay of social and economic spheres.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822383390
    Publication Date: 2002-04-03
    author-list-text: Martin Bruegel
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Martin Bruegel
    contrib-author: Martin Bruegel
    copyright-year: 2002
    eisbn: 9780822383390
    illustrations-note: 7 b&w photos, 23 tables, 3 maps
    isbn-cloth: 9780822328353
    isbn-paper: 9780822328490
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Bruegel shows how the development of a market economy created historical change in a parochial community.

    subtitle: The Rise of a Market Society in the Hudson Valley, 1780–1860
  • Fat Art, Thin Art
    Author(s): Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky
    Abstract:

    Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick is best known as a cultural and literary critic, as one of the primary forces behind the development of queer and gay/lesbian studies, and as author of several influential books: Tendencies, Epistemology of the Closet, and Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire. The publication of Fat Art, Thin Art, Sedgwick’s first volume of poetry, opens up another dimension of her continuing project of crossing and re-crossing the electrified boundaries between theory, lyric, and narrative.

    Embodying a decades-long adventure, the poems collected here offer the most accessible and definitive formulations to appear anywhere in Sedgwick’s writing on some characteristic subjects and some new ones: passionate attachments within and across genders; queer childhoods of many kinds; the performativity of a long, unconventional marriage; depressiveness, hilarity, and bliss; grave illness; despised and magnetic bodies and bodily parts. In two long fictional poems, a rich narrative momentum engages readers in the mysterious places—including Victorian novels—where characters, sexualities, and fates are unmade and made. Sedgwick’s poetry opens an unfamiliar, intimate, daring space that steadily refigures not only what a critic may be, but what a poem can do.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822382652
    Publication Date: 1994-08-09
    author-list-text: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
    contrib-author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
    copyright-year: 1994
    eisbn: 9780822382652
    isbn-cloth: 9780822315018
    isbn-paper: 9780822315124
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick is best known as a cultural and literary critic, as one of the primary forces behind the development of queer and gay/lesbian studies, and as author of several influential books: Tendencies, Epistemology of the Closet, and Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire. The publication of Fat Art, Thin Art, Sedgwick’s first volume of poetry, opens up another dimension of her continuing project of crossing and re-crossing the electrified boundaries between theory, lyric, and narrative.

    Embodying a decades-long adventure, the poems collected here offer the most accessible and definitive formulations to appear anywhere in Sedgwick’s writing on some characteristic subjects and some new ones: passionate attachments within and across genders; queer childhoods of many kinds; the performativity of a long, unconventional marriage; depressiveness, hilarity, and bliss; grave illness; despised and magnetic bodies and bodily parts. In two long fictional poems, a rich narrative momentum engages readers in the mysterious places—including Victorian novels—where characters, sexualities, and fates are unmade and made. Sedgwick’s poetry opens an unfamiliar, intimate, daring space that steadily refigures not only what a critic may be, but what a poem can do.

    subtitle:
  • Fatal Advice
    Author(s): Patton, Cindy
    Abstract:

    The American public responded to the first cases of AIDS with fear and panic. Both policymakers and activists were concerned not only with stopping the spread of the disease, but also with guiding the public’s response toward those already infected. Fatal Advice is an examination of how the nation attempted, with mixed results, to negotiate the fears and concerns brought on by the epidemic. A leading writer on the cultural politics of AIDS, Cindy Patton guides us through the thicket of mass-media productions, policy and public health enterprises, and activist projects as they sprang up to meet the challenge of the epidemic, shaping the nation’s notion of what safe-sex is and who ought to know what about it.

    There is the official story, and then there is another, involving local groups and AIDS activists. Going back to early government and activist attempts to spread information, Patton traces a slow separation between official advice and that provided by those on the front lines in the battle against AIDS. She shows how American anxieties about teen sex played into the nation’s inadequate education and protection of its young people, and chronicles the media’s attempts to encourage compassion without broaching the touchy subject of sex or disrupting the notion that AIDS was a disease of social and sexual outcasts. Her overview of the relationship between shifting medical perceptions and safe-sex advice reveals why radical safe-sex educators eventually turned to sexually explicit, including pornographic, representations to spread their message—and why even these extreme tactics could not overcome the misguided national teaching on AIDS.

    Patton closes with a stirring manifesto, an urgent call to action for all those who do not want to see the hard lessons of AIDS education and activism wasted, or, with these lessons, the loss of so many more lives.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822396727
    Publication Date: 2012-06-01
    author-list-text: Cindy Patton
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Cindy Patton
    contrib-author: Cindy Patton
    copyright-year: 1996
    eisbn: 9780822396727
    illustrations-note: 10 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822317500
    isbn-paper: 9780822317470
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Series Q
    subtitle: How Safe-Sex Education Went Wrong
  • Favored Flowers
    Author(s): Ziegler, Catherine
    Abstract:

    Billions of fresh-cut flowers are flown into the United States every year, allowing Americans to choose from a broad array of blooms regardless of the season. Favored Flowers is a lively investigation of the worldwide production and distribution of fresh-cut flowers and their consumption in the New York metropolitan area. In an ethnography filled with roses, orchids, and gerberas, flower auctions, new hybrids, and new logistical systems, Catherine Ziegler unravels the economic and cultural strands of the global flower market. She provides an historical overview of the development of the cut flower industry in New York from the late nineteenth century to 1970, and on to its ultimate transformation from a domestic to a global industry. As she points out, cut flowers serve no utilitarian purpose; rather, they signal consumers’ social and cultural decisions about expressing love, mourning, status, and identity. Ziegler shows how consumer behavior and choices have changed over time and how they are shaped by the media, by the types of available flowers, and by flower retailing.

    Ziegler interviewed more than 250 people as she followed flowers along the full length of the commodity chain, from cuttings in Europe and Latin America to vases in and around New York. She examines the daily experiences of flower growers in the Netherlands and Ecuador, two leading exporters of flowers to the United States. Primary focus, though, is on others in the commodity chain: exporters, importers, wholesalers, and retailers. She follows their activities as they respond to changing competition, supply, and consumer behavior in a market characterized by risk, volatility, and imperfect knowledge. By tracing changes in the wholesale and retail systems, she shows the recent development of two complementary commodity chains in New York and the United States generally. One leads to a high-end luxury market served by specialty florists and designers, and the other to a lower-priced mass market served by chain groceries, corner delis, and retail superstores.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822390015
    Publication Date: 2007-06-19
    author-list-text: Catherine Ziegler
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Catherine Ziegler
    contrib-author: Catherine Ziegler
    copyright-year: 2007
    eisbn: 9780822390015
    illustrations-note: 17 photos, 11 tables, 19 figures
    isbn-cloth: 9780822340072
    isbn-paper: 9780822340263
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Cultural history of the flower trade in New York City and the transformation of the cut-flower industry into a global commodity system.

    subtitle: Culture and Economy in a Global System
  • FDR and the Spanish Civil War
    Author(s): Tierney, Dominic; Joseph, Gilbert M.; Rosenberg, Emily S.
    Abstract:

    What was the relationship between President Franklin D. Roosevelt, architect of America’s rise to global power, and the 1936–39 Spanish Civil War, which inspired passion and sacrifice, and shaped the road to world war? While many historians have portrayed the Spanish Civil War as one of Roosevelt’s most isolationist episodes, Dominic Tierney argues that it marked the president’s first attempt to challenge fascist aggression in Europe. Drawing on newly discovered archival documents, Tierney describes the evolution of Roosevelt’s thinking about the Spanish Civil War in relation to America’s broader geopolitical interests, as well as the fierce controversy in the United States over Spanish policy.

    Between 1936 and 1939, Roosevelt’s perceptions of the Spanish Civil War were transformed. Initially indifferent toward which side won, FDR became an increasingly committed supporter of the leftist government. He believed that German and Italian intervention in Spain was part of a broader program of fascist aggression, and he worried that the Spanish Civil War would inspire fascist revolutions in Latin America. In response, Roosevelt tried to send food to Spain as well as illegal covert aid to the Spanish government, and to mediate a compromise solution to the civil war. However unsuccessful these initiatives proved in the end, they represented an important stage in Roosevelt’s emerging strategy to aid democracy in Europe.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822390626
    Publication Date: 2007-06-11
    author-list-text: Dominic Tierney, Gilbert M. Joseph and Emily S. Rosenberg
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Dominic Tierney,
    2. Gilbert M. Joseph and
    3. Emily S. Rosenberg
    contrib-author: Dominic Tierney
    contrib-series-editor: Gilbert M. Joseph; Emily S. Rosenberg
    copyright-year: 2007
    eisbn: 9780822390626
    illustrations-note: 4 maps
    isbn-cloth: 9780822340553
    isbn-paper: 9780822340768
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: American Encounters/Global Interactions
    short-abstract:

    Provides new understanding of Franklin Roosevelt's involvement in the Spanish Civil War, claiming that he was activist and pro-Loyalist.

    subtitle: Neutrality and Commitment in the Struggle that Divided America
  • Fear of Small Numbers
    Author(s): Appadurai, Arjun; Gaonkar, Dilip Parameshwar; Kramer, Jane; Lee, Benjamin; Warner, Michael
    Abstract:

    The period since 1989 has been marked by the global endorsement of open markets, the free flow of finance capital and liberal ideas of constitutional rule, and the active expansion of human rights. Why, then, in this era of intense globalization, has there been a proliferation of violence, of ethnic cleansing on the one hand and extreme forms of political violence against civilian populations on the other?

    Fear of Small Numbers is Arjun Appadurai’s answer to that question. A leading theorist of globalization, Appadurai turns his attention to the complex dynamics fueling large-scale, culturally motivated violence, from the genocides that racked Eastern Europe, Rwanda, and India in the early 1990s to the contemporary “war on terror.” Providing a conceptually innovative framework for understanding sources of global violence, he describes how the nation-state has grown ambivalent about minorities at the same time that minorities, because of global communication technologies and migration flows, increasingly see themselves as parts of powerful global majorities. By exacerbating the inequalities produced by globalization, the volatile, slippery relationship between majorities and minorities foments the desire to eradicate cultural difference.

    Appadurai analyzes the darker side of globalization: suicide bombings; anti-Americanism; the surplus of rage manifest in televised beheadings; the clash of global ideologies; and the difficulties that flexible, cellular organizations such as Al-Qaeda present to centralized, “vertebrate” structures such as national governments. Powerful, provocative, and timely, Fear of Small Numbers is a thoughtful invitation to rethink what violence is in an age of globalization.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822387541
    Publication Date: 2006-05-03
    author-list-text: Arjun Appadurai, Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar, Jane Kramer, Benjamin Lee and Michael Warner
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Arjun Appadurai,
    2. Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar,
    3. Jane Kramer,
    4. Benjamin Lee and
    5. Michael Warner
    contrib-author: Arjun Appadurai
    contrib-series-editor: Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar; Jane Kramer; Benjamin Lee; Michael Warner
    copyright-year: 2006
    eisbn: 9780822387541
    isbn-cloth: 9780822338345
    isbn-paper: 9780822338635
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: a John Hope Franklin Center Book
    short-abstract:

    Argues that the many forms of ethnic violence around the world, both internal and transnational, need to be seen in the context of globalization.

    subtitle: An Essay on the Geography of Anger
  • Federal Criminal Law Doctrines
    Author(s): Murchison, Kenneth M.
    Abstract:

    This book offers a close look at the development of legal thought during the era of prohibition and documents the impact of prohibition on law as an intellectual discipline. Kenneth M. Murchison examines changes in federal criminal law doctrines from 1918 to 1933 in light of recent historical scholarship on prohibition and its impact on American society. He identifies these federal doctrinal developments as an important but ignored legacy of prohibition and describes how these changes continue to effect contemporary law.

    In this detailed examination, Murchison considers a portion of the Supreme Court’s work prior to the New Deal crisis, a period insufficiently considered until now. Among the developments he discusses are those relating to the defense of entrapment, the Fourth Amendment’s protection against unreasonable search and seizure, the Fifth Amendment’s prohibition against double jeopardy, property forfeitures, and the jury trial guarantees for criminal proceedings. His analysis reveals a court less rigid, less consistently divided along modern ideological lines, and more tolerant of governmental authority than traditional wisdom would suggest. Thus, Murchison offers a framework for a revisionist view of the Supreme Court’s activities during this period.

    Exploring an important connection between the Eighteenth Amendment, the Volstead Act, and the development of federal criminal law, this book documents what was arguably the nation’s first criminal law revolution at the federal level. Explaining the modern origins of doctrines that still inform federal criminal law, Murchison also provides a case study of how legal doctrine responds to changing social conditions. Federal Criminal Law Doctrines will add immeasurably to the work of historians and legal scholars alike.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822379164
    Publication Date: 2012-08-01
    author-list-text: Kenneth M. Murchison
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Kenneth M. Murchison
    contrib-author: Kenneth M. Murchison
    copyright-year: 1994
    eisbn: 9780822379164
    isbn-cloth: 9780822315100
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    subtitle: The Forgotten Influence of National Prohibition
  • Feeding Anorexia
    Author(s): Gremillion, Helen; Appadurai, Arjun; Comaroff, John L.; Farquhar, Judith
    Abstract:

    Feeding Anorexia challenges prevailing assumptions regarding the notorious difficulty of curing anorexia nervosa. Through a vivid chronicle of treatments at a state-of-the-art hospital program, Helen Gremillion reveals how the therapies participate unwittingly in culturally dominant ideals of gender, individualism, physical fitness, and family life that have contributed to the dramatic increase in the incidence of anorexia in the United States since the 1970s. She describes how strategies including the meticulous measurement of patients' progress in terms of body weight and calories consumed ultimately feed the problem, not only reinforcing ideas about the regulation of women's bodies, but also fostering in many girls and women greater expertise in the formidable constellation of skills anorexia requires. At the same time, Gremillion shows how contradictions and struggles in treatment can help open up spaces for change.

    Feeding Anorexia is based on fourteen months of ethnographic research in a small inpatient unit located in a major teaching and research hospital in the western United States. Gremillion attended group, family, and individual therapy sessions and medical staff meetings; ate meals with patients; and took part in outings and recreational activities. She also conducted over one hundred interviews-with patients, parents, staff, and clinicians. Among the issues she explores are the relationship between calorie-counting and the management of consumer desire; why the "typical" anorexic patient is middle-class and white; the extent to which power differentials among clinicians, staff, and patients model "anorexic families"; and the potential of narrative therapy to constructively reframe some of the problematic assumptions underlying more mainstream treatments.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822385011
    Publication Date: 2003-08-01
    author-list-text: Helen Gremillion, Arjun Appadurai, John L. Comaroff and Judith Farquhar
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Helen Gremillion,
    2. Arjun Appadurai,
    3. John L. Comaroff and
    4. Judith Farquhar
    contrib-author: Helen Gremillion
    contrib-series-editor: Arjun Appadurai; John L. Comaroff; Judith Farquhar
    copyright-year: 2003
    eisbn: 9780822385011
    isbn-cloth: 9780822331339
    isbn-paper: 9780822331209
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Body, Commodity, Text
    short-abstract:

    A groundbreaking study of anorexia treatment that shows how the treatment often makes the diesease worse.

    subtitle: Gender and Power at a Treatment Center
  • Feeling Photography
    Author(s): Brown, Elspeth H.; Phu, Thy
    Abstract:

    This innovative collection demonstrates the profound effects of feeling on our experiences and understanding of photography. It includes essays on the tactile nature of photos, the relation of photography to sentiment and intimacy, and the ways that affect pervades the photographic archive. Concerns associated with the affective turn—intimacy, alterity, and ephemerality, as well as queerness, modernity, and loss—run through the essays. At the same time, the contributions are informed by developments in critical race theory, postcolonial studies, and feminist theory. As the contributors bring affect theory to bear on photography, some interpret the work of contemporary artists, such as Catherine Opie, Tammy Rae Carland, Christian Boltanski, Marcelo Brodsky, Zoe Leonard, and Rea Tajiri. Others look back, whether to the work of the American Pictorialist F. Holland Day or to the discontent masked by the smiles of black families posing for cartes de visite in a Kodak marketing campaign. With more than sixty photographs, including twenty in color, this collection changes how we see, think about, and feel photography, past and present.

    Contributors. Elizabeth Abel, Elspeth H. Brown, Kimberly Juanita Brown, Lisa Cartwright, Lily Cho, Ann Cvetkovich, David L. Eng, Marianne Hirsch, Thy Phu, Christopher Pinney, Marlis Schweitzer, Dana Seitler, Tanya Sheehan, Shawn Michelle Smith, Leo Spitzer, Diana Taylor

     

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822377313
    Publication Date: 2014-03-12
    contrib-editor: Elspeth H. Brown; Thy Phu
    copyright-year: 2014
    eisbn: 9780822377313
    illustrations-note: 62 photographs, incl. 20 in color
    isbn-cloth: 9780822355267
    isbn-paper: 9780822355410
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    With more than sixty photographs, including twenty in color, changes how we see, think about, and feel photography, past and present. It includes essays on the tactile nature of photos, the relation of photography to sentiment and intimacy, and the ways that affect pervades the photographic archive.

    subtitle:
  • Feeling Women’s Liberation
    Author(s): Hesford, Victoria
    Abstract:

    The term women's liberation remains charged and divisive decades after it first entered political and cultural discourse around 1970. In Feeling Women's Liberation, Victoria Hesford mines the archive of that highly contested era to reassess how it has been represented and remembered. Hesford refocuses debates about the movement’s history and influence. Rather than interpreting women's liberation in terms of success or failure, she approaches the movement as a range of rhetorical strategies that were used to persuade and enact a new political constituency and, ultimately, to bring a new world into being. Hesford focuses on rhetoric, tracking the production and deployment of particular phrases and figures in both the mainstream press and movement writings, including the work of Kate Millett. She charts the emergence of the feminist-as-lesbian as a persistent "image-memory" of women's liberation, and she demonstrates how the trope has obscured the complexity of the women's movement and its lasting impact on feminism.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822397519
    Publication Date: 2013-05-28
    author-list-text: Victoria Hesford
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Victoria Hesford
    contrib-author: Victoria Hesford
    copyright-year: 2013
    eisbn: 9780822397519
    illustrations-note: 4 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822353768
    isbn-paper: 9780822353904
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Next Wave: New Directions in Women's Studies
    short-abstract:

    Revisiting the rhetoric about and from within the women's liberation movement of the 1960s and 1970s, Victoria Hesford argues that contemporary accounts of the movement obscure its diversity.

    subtitle:
  • Female Masculinity
    Author(s): Halberstam, Jack
    Abstract:

    Masculinity without men. In Female Masculinity Judith Halberstam takes aim at the protected status of male masculinity and shows that female masculinity has offered a distinct alternative to it for well over two hundred years. Providing the first full-length study on this subject, Halberstam catalogs the diversity of gender expressions among masculine women from nineteenth-century pre-lesbian practices to contemporary drag king performances.

    Through detailed textual readings as well as empirical research, Halberstam uncovers a hidden history of female masculinities while arguing for a more nuanced understanding of gender categories that would incorporate rather than pathologize them. She rereads Anne Lister’s diaries and Radclyffe Hall’s The Well of Loneliness as foundational assertions of female masculine identity. She considers the enigma of the stone butch and the politics surrounding butch/femme roles within lesbian communities. She also explores issues of transsexuality among “transgender dykes”—lesbians who pass as men—and female-to-male transsexuals who may find the label of “lesbian” a temporary refuge. Halberstam also tackles such topics as women and boxing, butches in Hollywood and independent cinema, and the phenomenon of male impersonators.

    Female Masculinity signals a new understanding of masculine behaviors and identities, and a new direction in interdisciplinary queer scholarship. Illustrated with nearly forty photographs, including portraits, film stills, and drag king performance shots, this book provides an extensive record of the wide range of female masculinities. And as Halberstam clearly demonstrates, female masculinity is not some bad imitation of virility, but a lively and dramatic staging of hybrid and minority genders.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822378112
    Publication Date: 2012-10-01
    author-list-text: Jack Halberstam
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Jack Halberstam
    contrib-author: Jack Halberstam
    copyright-year: 1988
    eisbn: 9780822378112
    illustrations-note: 38 b&w photographs
    isbn-cloth: 9780822322269
    isbn-paper: 9780822322436
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    subtitle:
  • Femininity in Flight
    Author(s): Barry, Kathleen; Walkowitz, Daniel J.
    Abstract:

    “In her new chic outfit, she looks like anything but a stewardess working. But work she does. Hard, too. And you hardly know it.” So read the text of a 1969 newspaper advertisement for Delta Airlines featuring a picture of a brightly smiling blond stewardess striding confidently down the aisle of an airplane cabin to deliver a meal.

    From the moment the first stewardesses took flight in 1930, flight attendants became glamorous icons of femininity. For decades, airlines hired only young, attractive, unmarried white women. They marketed passenger service aloft as an essentially feminine exercise in exuding charm, looking fabulous, and providing comfort. The actual work that flight attendants did—ensuring passenger safety, assuaging fears, serving food and drinks, all while conforming to airlines’ strict rules about appearance—was supposed to appear effortless; the better that stewardesses performed by airline standards, the more hidden were their skills and labor. Yet today flight attendants are acknowledged safety experts; they have their own unions. Gone are the no-marriage rules, the mandates to retire by thirty-two. In Femininity in Flight, Kathleen M. Barry tells the history of flight attendants, tracing the evolution of their glamorized image as ideal women and their activism as trade unionists and feminists.

    Barry argues that largely because their glamour obscured their labor, flight attendants unionized in the late 1940s and 1950s to demand recognition and respect as workers and self-styled professionals. In the 1960s and 1970s, flight attendants were one of the first groups to take advantage of new laws prohibiting sex discrimination. Their challenges to airlines’ restrictive employment policies and exploitive marketing practices (involving skimpy uniforms and provocative slogans such as “fly me”) made them high-profile critics of the cultural mystification and economic devaluing of “women’s work.” Barry combines attention to the political economy and technology of the airline industry with perceptive readings of popular culture, newspapers, industry publications, and first-person accounts. In so doing, she provides a potent mix of social and cultural history and a major contribution to the history of women’s work and working women’s activism.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822389507
    Publication Date: 2007-02-07
    author-list-text: Kathleen Barry and Daniel J. Walkowitz
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Kathleen Barry and
    2. Daniel J. Walkowitz
    contrib-author: Kathleen Barry
    contrib-series-editor: Daniel J. Walkowitz
    copyright-year: 2007
    eisbn: 9780822389507
    illustrations-note: 19 b&w photos
    isbn-cloth: 9780822339342
    isbn-paper: 9780822339465
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Radical Perspectives
    short-abstract:

    Considers flight attendants as cultural icons, looking at the history of the occupation and how attendants redeployed the "glamorization" used to sell air travel to campaign for professional respect, higher wages, and women's rights.

    subtitle: A History of Flight Attendants
  • Feminism without Borders
    Author(s): Mohanty, Chandra Talpade
    Abstract:

    Bringing together classic and new writings of the trailblazing feminist theorist Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Feminism without Borders addresses some of the most pressing and complex issues facing contemporary feminism. Forging vital links between daily life and collective action and between theory and pedagogy, Mohanty has been at the vanguard of Third World and international feminist thought and activism for nearly two decades. This collection highlights the concerns running throughout her pioneering work: the politics of difference and solidarity, decolonizing and democratizing feminist practice, the crossing of borders, and the relation of feminist knowledge and scholarship to organizing and social movements. Mohanty offers here a sustained critique of globalization and urges a reorientation of transnational feminist practice toward anticapitalist struggles.

    Feminism without Borders opens with Mohanty's influential critique of western feminism ("Under Western Eyes") and closes with a reconsideration of that piece based on her latest thinking regarding the ways that gender matters in the racial, class, and national formations of globalization. In between these essays, Mohanty meditates on the lives of women workers at different ends of the global assembly line (in India, the United Kingdom, and the United States); feminist writing on experience, identity, and community; dominant conceptions of multiculturalism and citizenship; and the corporatization of the North American academy. She considers the evolution of interdisciplinary programs like Women's Studies and Race and Ethnic Studies; pedagogies of accommodation and dissent; and transnational women's movements for grassroots ecological solutions and consumer, health, and reproductive rights. Mohanty's probing and provocative analyses of key concepts in feminist thought—"home," "sisterhood," "experience," "community"—lead the way toward a feminism without borders, a feminism fully engaged with the realities of a transnational world.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822384649
    Publication Date: 2003-02-07
    author-list-text: Chandra Talpade Mohanty
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Chandra Talpade Mohanty
    contrib-author: Chandra Talpade Mohanty
    copyright-year: 2003
    eisbn: 9780822384649
    isbn-cloth: 9780822330103
    isbn-paper: 9780822330219
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Essays by a pioneering theorist of feminism, multiculturalism, and antiracism.

    subtitle: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity
  • Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment
    Author(s): Gallop, Jane
    Abstract:

    Sexual harassment is an issue in which feminists are usually thought to be on the plaintiff’s side. But in 1993—amid considerable attention from the national academic community—Jane Gallop, a prominent feminist professor of literature, was accused of sexual harassment by two of her women graduate students. In Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment, Gallop tells the story of how and why she was charged with sexual harassment and what resulted from the accusations. Weaving together memoir and theoretical reflections, Gallop uses her dramatic personal experience to offer a vivid analysis of current trends in sexual harassment policy and to pose difficult questions regarding teaching and sex, feminism and knowledge.

    Comparing “still new” feminism—as she first encountered it in the early 1970s—with the more established academic discipline that women’s studies has become, Gallop makes a case for the intertwining of learning and pleasure. Refusing to acquiesce to an imperative of silence that surrounds such issues, Gallop acknowledges—and describes—her experiences with the eroticism of learning and teaching. She argues that antiharassment activism has turned away from the feminism that created it and suggests that accusations of harassment are taking aim at the inherent sexuality of professional and pedagogic activity rather than indicting discrimination based on gender—that antiharassment has been transformed into a sensationalist campaign against sexuality itself.

    Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment offers a direct and challenging perspective on the complex and charged issues surrounding the intersection of politics, sexuality, feminism, and power. Gallop’s story and her characteristically bold way of telling it will be compelling reading for anyone interested in these issues and particularly to anyone interested in the ways they pertain to the university.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822396741
    Publication Date: 2012-06-01
    author-list-text: Jane Gallop
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Jane Gallop
    contrib-author: Jane Gallop
    copyright-year: 1997
    eisbn: 9780822396741
    isbn-cloth: 9780822319252
    isbn-paper: 9780822319184
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Public planet books
    subtitle:
  • Feminist Agendas and Democracy in Latin America
    Author(s): Jaquette, Jane S.; Ríos Tobar, Marcela; Marx, Jutta; Borner, Jutta; Caminotti, Mariana
    Abstract:

    Latin American women’s movements played important roles in the democratic transitions in South America during the 1980s and in Central America during the 1990s. However, very little has been written on what has become of these movements and their agendas since the return to democracy. This timely collection examines how women’s movements have responded to the dramatic political, economic, and social changes of the last twenty years. In these essays, leading scholar-activists focus on the various strategies women’s movements have adopted and assess their successes and failures.

    The book is organized around three broad topics. The first, women’s access to political power at the national level, is addressed by essays on the election of Michelle Bachelet in Chile, gender quotas in Argentina and Brazil, and the responses of the women’s movement to the “Bolivarian revolution” in Venezuela. The second topic, the use of legal strategies, is taken up in essays on women’s rights across the board in Argentina, violence against women in Brazil, and gender in the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Peru. Finally, the international impact of Latin American feminists is explored through an account of their participation in the World Social Forum, an assessment of a Chilean-led project carried out by women’s organizations in several countries to hold governments to the promises they made at international conferences in Cairo and Beijing, and an account of cross-border organizing to address femicides and domestic abuse in the Juárez-El Paso border region. Jane S. Jaquette provides the historical and political context of women’s movement activism in her introduction, and concludes the volume by engaging contemporary debates about feminism, civil society, and democracy.

    Contributors. Jutta Borner, Mariana Caminotti, Alina Donoso, Gioconda Espina, Jane S. Jaquette, Beatriz Kohen, Julissa Mantilla Falcón, Jutta Marx, Gabriela L. Montoya, Flávia Piovesan, Marcela Ríos Tobar, Kathleen Staudt, Teresa Valdés, Virginia Vargas

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822392569
    Publication Date: 2009-06-19
    author-list-text: Marcela Ríos Tobar, Jutta Marx, Jutta Borner and Mariana Caminotti
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Marcela Ríos Tobar,
    2. Jutta Marx,
    3. Jutta Borner and
    4. Mariana Caminotti
    contrib-editor: Jane S. Jaquette
    contrib-other: Marcela Ríos Tobar; Jutta Marx; Jutta Borner; Mariana Caminotti
    copyright-year: 2009
    eisbn: 9780822392569
    illustrations-note: 5 graphs
    isbn-cloth: 9780822344377
    isbn-paper: 9780822344490
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: e-Duke books scholarly collection.
    short-abstract:

    A timely collection examining how women s movements in Latin America have responded to the dramatic political, economic, and social changes of the last twenty years.

    subtitle:
  • Feminist Surveillance Studies
    Author(s): Dubrofsky, Rachel E.; Magnet, Shoshana Amielle
    Abstract:

    Questions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have largely been left unexamined in surveillance studies. The contributors to this field-defining collection take up these questions, and in so doing provide new directions for analyzing surveillance. They use feminist theory to expose the ways in which surveillance practices and technologies are tied to systemic forms of discrimination that serve to normalize whiteness, able-bodiedness, capitalism, and heterosexuality. The essays discuss the implications of, among others, patriarchal surveillance in colonial North America, surveillance aimed at curbing the trafficking of women and sex work, women presented as having agency in the creation of the images that display their bodies via social media, full-body airport scanners, and mainstream news media discussion of honor killings in Canada and the concomitant surveillance of Muslim bodies. Rather than rehashing arguments as to whether or not surveillance keeps the state safe, the contributors investigate what constitutes surveillance, who is scrutinized, why, and at what cost. The work fills a gap in feminist scholarship and shows that gender, race, class, and sexuality should be central to any study of surveillance.

    Contributors. Seantel Anaïs, Mark Andrejevic, Paisley Currah, Sayantani DasGupta, Shamita Das Dasgupta, Rachel E. Dubrofsky, Rachel Hall, Lisa Jean Moore, Yasmin Jiwani, Ummni Khan, Shoshana Amielle Magnet, Kelli Moore, Lisa Nakamura, Dorothy Roberts, Andrea Smith, Kevin Walby, Megan M. Wood, Laura Hyun Yi Kang

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822375463
    Publication Date: 2015-05-15
    contrib-editor: Rachel E. Dubrofsky; Shoshana Amielle Magnet
    copyright-year: 2015
    eisbn: 9780822375463
    illustrations-note: 8 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822359203
    isbn-paper: 9780822358923
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Feminist Surveillance Studies is a field-defining collection that places gender, race, class, and sexuality at the center of surveillance studies. Concerned with exposing the ways in which surveillance is tied to discrimination, the contributors investigate what constitutes surveillance, who is scrutinized, why, and at what cost.

    subtitle:
  • Fevered Measures
    Author(s): Mckiernan-González, John
    Abstract:

    In Fevered Measures, John Mckiernan-González examines public health campaigns along the Texas-Mexico border between 1848 and 1942 and reveals the changing medical and political frameworks U.S. health authorities used when facing the threat of epidemic disease. The medical borders created by these officials changed with each contagion and sometimes varied from the existing national borders. Federal officers sought to distinguish Mexican citizens from U.S. citizens, a process troubled by the deeply interconnected nature of border communities. Mckiernan-González uncovers forgotten or ignored cases in which Mexicans, Mexican Americans, African Americans, and other groups were subject to—and sometimes agents of—quarantines, inspections, detentions, and forced-treatment regimens. These cases illustrate the ways that medical encounters shaped border identities before and after the Mexican Revolution. Mckiernan-González also maintains that the threat of disease provided a venue to destabilize identity at the border, enacted processes of racialization, and re-legitimized the power of U.S. policymakers. He demonstrates how this complex history continues to shape and frame contemporary perceptions of the Latino body today.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822395416
    Publication Date: 2012-08-01
    author-list-text: John Mckiernan-González
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. John Mckiernan-González
    contrib-author: John Mckiernan-González
    copyright-year: 2012
    eisbn: 9780822395416
    illustrations-note: 17 illustrations, 9 tables
    isbn-cloth: 9780822352570
    isbn-paper: 9780822352761
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    In Fevered Measures, John Mckiernan-González examines public health campaigns along the Texas-Mexico border between 1848 and 1942 and reveals the changing medical and political frameworks U.S. health authorities used when facing the threat of epidemic disease.

    subtitle: Public Health and Race at the Texas-Mexico Border, 1848–1942
  • Fighting for Recognition
    Author(s): Smith, R. Tyson
    Abstract:

    In Fighting for Recognition, R. Tyson Smith enters the world of independent professional wrestling, a community-based entertainment staged in community centers, high school gyms, and other modest venues. Like the big-name, televised pro wrestlers who originally inspired them, indie wrestlers engage in choreographed fights in character. Smith details the experiences, meanings, and motivations of the young men who wrestle as "Lethal" or "Southern Bad Boy," despite receiving little to no pay and risking the possibility of serious and sometimes permanent injury. Exploring intertwined issues of gender, class, violence, and the body, he sheds new light on the changing sources of identity in a postindustrial society that increasingly features low wages, insecure employment, and fragmented social support. Smith uncovers the tensions between strength and vulnerability, pain and solidarity, and homophobia and homoeroticism that play out both backstage and in the ring as the wrestlers seek recognition from fellow performers and devoted fans.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822376408
    Publication Date: 2014-07-21
    author-list-text: R. Tyson Smith
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. R. Tyson Smith
    contrib-author: R. Tyson Smith
    copyright-year: 2014
    eisbn: 9780822376408
    illustrations-note: 27 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822357094
    isbn-paper: 9780822357223
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    In this riveting ethnography, R. Tyson Smith takes readers into the world of independent professional wrestling, where young men, mostly from mostly working-class suburban backgrounds, compete in community centers, high-school gyms, and other modest venues. Smith considers why many young men choose to compete on independent wrestling circuits, thereby subjecting themselves to ridicule, damaging their bodies and risking their relationships and jobs.

    subtitle: Identity, Masculinity, and the Act of Violence in Professional Wrestling
  • Figurations
    Author(s): Castañeda, Claudia; Grewal, Inderpal; Kaplan, Caren; Wiegman, Robyn
    Abstract:

    Always in the process of becoming, inherently incomplete, the child is a remarkably malleable figure. In Figurations, Claudia Castañeda shows how this malleability is itself generated—how the child is "made" by different constituencies and how the resulting historically, geographically, and culturally specific figures are put to widely divergent uses, often to very powerful effect. Situated at the intersection of feminist, postcolonial, cultural, and science and technology studies, this book provides a remarkable map of the child's meaning and movement across transnational circuits of exchange.

    Castañeda investigates the construction of the child as both a natural and cultural body, the character of its embodiment, and its imaginative appeal in various settings. The sites through which she tracks the bodily production and deployment of the child include nineteenth-century developmental science; cognitive neuroscience in the late twentieth century; international adoption; rumors and media coverage of child-organ stealing; and poststructuralist theory. Her work reveals the extent to which the child's cultural significance and value lie in its status as a body whose incompleteness makes it "available" for such varied uses. Figurations establishes the child as a key figure for understanding and rethinking the politics of nature, culture, bodies, and subjects in changing "global" worlds.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822383895
    Publication Date: 2002-11-08
    author-list-text: Claudia Castañeda, Inderpal Grewal, Caren Kaplan and Robyn Wiegman
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Claudia Castañeda,
    2. Inderpal Grewal,
    3. Caren Kaplan and
    4. Robyn Wiegman
    contrib-author: Claudia Castañeda
    contrib-series-editor: Inderpal Grewal; Caren Kaplan; Robyn Wiegman
    copyright-year: 2002
    eisbn: 9780822383895
    illustrations-note: 6 illus.
    isbn-cloth: 9780822329589
    isbn-paper: 9780822329695
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Next Wave: New Directions in Women's Studies
    short-abstract:

    An interdisciplinary examination of debates surrounding the figure of the child in transnational politics and culture.

    subtitle: Child, Bodies, Worlds
  • Figures of Conversion
    Author(s): Ragussis, Michael
    Abstract:

    "I knew a Man, who having nothing but a summary Notion of Religion himself, and being wicked and profligate to the last Degree in his Life, made a thorough Reformation in himself, by labouring to convert a Jew."

    —Daniel Defoe, The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719)

    When the hero of Defoe’s novel listens skeptically to this anecdote related by a French Roman Catholic priest, he little suspects that in less than a century the conversion of the Jews would become nothing short of a national project—not in France but in England. In this book, Michael Ragussis explores the phenomenon of Jewish conversion—the subject of popular enthusiasm, public scandal, national debate, and dubbed "the English madness" by its critics—in Protestant England from the 1790s through the 1870s.

    Moving beyond the familiar catalog of anti-Semitic stereotypes, Ragussis analyzes the rhetoric of conversion as it was reinvented by the English in sermons, stories for the young, histories of the Jews, memoirs by Jewish converts, and popular novels. Alongside these texts and the countertexts produced by English Jews, he situates such writers as Edgeworth, Scott, Disraeli, Arnold, Trollope, and Eliot within the debate over conversion and related issues of race, gender, and nation-formation. His work reveals how a powerful group of emergent cultural projects—including a revisionist tradition of the novel, the new science of ethnology, and the rewriting of European history—redefined English national identity in response to the ideology of conversion, the history of the Jews, and "the Jewish question."

    Figures of Conversion offers an entirely new way of regarding Jewish identity in nineteenth-century British culture and will be of importance not only to literary scholars but also to scholars of Judaic and religious studies, history, and cultural studies.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822378129
    Publication Date: 2012-10-01
    author-list-text: Michael Ragussis
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Michael Ragussis
    contrib-author: Michael Ragussis
    copyright-year: 1995
    eisbn: 9780822378129
    illustrations-note: 20 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822315599
    isbn-paper: 9780822315704
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Post-contemporary interventions
    subtitle: “The Jewish Question” and English National Identity
  • Figures of Resistance
    Author(s): Okada, Richard H.; Fish, Stanley; Jameson, Fredric
    Abstract:

    In this revisionist study of texts from the mid-Heian period in Japan, H. Richard Okada offers new readings of three well-known tales: The Tale of the Bamboo-cutter, The Tale of Ise, and The Tale of Genji. Okada contends that the cultural and gendered significance of these works has been distorted by previous commentaries and translations belonging to the larger patriarchal and colonialist discourse of Western civilization. He goes on to suggest that this universalist discourse, which silences the feminine aspects of these texts and subsumes their writing in misapplied Western canonical literary terms, is sanctioned and maintained by the discipline of Japanese literature.

    Okada develops a highly original and sophisticated reading strategy that demonstrates how readers might understand texts belonging to a different time and place without being complicit in their assimilation to categories derived from Western literary traditions. The author’s reading stratgey is based on the texts’ own resistance to modes of analysis that employ such Western canonical terms as novel, lyric, and third-person narrative. Emphasis is also given to the distinctive cultural circles, as well as socio-political and genealogical circumstances that surrounded the emergence of the texts.

    Indispensable readings for specialists in literature, cultural studies, and Japanese literature and history, Figures of Resistance will also appeal to general readers interested in the problems and complexities of studying another culture.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822381723
    Publication Date: 1991-10-31
    author-list-text: Richard H. Okada, Stanley Fish and Fredric Jameson
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Richard H. Okada,
    2. Stanley Fish and
    3. Fredric Jameson
    contrib-author: Richard H. Okada
    contrib-series-editor: Stanley Fish; Fredric Jameson
    copyright-year: 1991
    eisbn: 9780822381723
    isbn-cloth: 9780822311850
    isbn-paper: 9780822311928
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Post-Contemporary Interventions
    short-abstract:

    In this revisionist study of texts from the mid-Heian period in Japan, H. Richard Okada offers new readings of three well-known tales: The Tale of the Bamboo-cutter, The Tale of Ise, and The Tale of Genji. Okada contends that the cultural and gendered significance of these works has been distorted by previous commentaries and translations belonging to the larger patriarchal and colonialist discourse of Western civilization. He goes on to suggest that this universalist discourse, which silences the feminine aspects of these texts and subsumes their writing in misapplied Western canonical literary terms, is sanctioned and maintained by the discipline of Japanese literature.

    Okada develops a highly original and sophisticated reading strategy that demonstrates how readers might understand texts belonging to a different time and place without being complicit in their assimilation to categories derived from Western literary traditions. The author’s reading stratgey is based on the texts’ own resistance to modes of analysis that employ such Western canonical terms as novel, lyric, and third-person narrative. Emphasis is also given to the distinctive cultural circles, as well as socio-political and genealogical circumstances that surrounded the emergence of the texts.

    Indispensable readings for specialists in literature, cultural studies, and Japanese literature and history, Figures of Resistance will also appeal to general readers interested in the problems and complexities of studying another culture.

    subtitle: Language, Poetry, and Narrating in The Tale of the Genji and Other Mid-Heian Texts
  • Film Blackness
    Author(s): Gillespie, Michael Boyce
    Abstract:

    In Film Blackness Michael Boyce Gillespie shifts the ways we think about black film, treating it not as a category, a genre, or strictly a representation of the black experience but as a visual negotiation between film as art and the discursivity of race. Gillespie challenges expectations that black film can or should represent the reality of black life or provide answers to social problems. Instead, he frames black film alongside literature, music, art, photography, and new media, treating it as an interdisciplinary form that enacts black visual and expressive culture. Gillespie discusses the racial grotesque in Ralph Bakshi's Coonskin (1975), black performativity in Wendell B. Harris Jr.'s Chameleon Street (1989), blackness and noir in Bill Duke's Deep Cover (1992), and how place and desire impact blackness in Barry Jenkins's Medicine for Melancholy (2008). Considering how each film represents a distinct conception of the relationship between race and cinema, Gillespie recasts the idea of black film and poses new paradigms for genre, narrative, aesthetics, historiography, and intertextuality.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822373889
    Publication Date: 2016-08-19
    author-list-text: Michael Boyce Gillespie
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Michael Boyce Gillespie
    contrib-author: Michael Boyce Gillespie
    copyright-year: 2016
    eisbn: 9780822373889
    illustrations-note: 50 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822362050
    isbn-paper: 9780822362265
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Michael Boyce Gillespie shifts the ways we think about black film, seeing it not as the representation of the black experience, but as the visual negotiation between film as art and the social construction of race, as well as an interdisciplinary form that enacts black visual and expressive culture.

    subtitle: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film
  • Financial Derivatives and the Globalization of Risk
    Author(s): Lee, Benjamin; LiPuma, Edward; Gaonkar, Dilip Parameshwar; Kramer, Jane; Warner, Michael
    Abstract:

    The market for financial derivatives is far and away the largest and most powerful market in the world, and it is growing exponentially. In 1970 the yearly valuation of financial derivatives was only a few million dollars. By 1980 the sum had swollen to nearly one hundred million dollars. By 1990 it had climbed to almost one hundred billion dollars, and in 2000 it approached one hundred trillion. Created and sustained by a small number of European and American banks, corporations, and hedge funds, the derivatives market has an enormous impact on the economies of nations—particularly poorer nations—because it controls the price of money. Derivatives bought and sold by means of computer keystrokes in London and New York affect the price of food, clothing, and housing in Johannesburg, Kuala Lumpur, and Buenos Aires. Arguing that social theorists concerned with globalization must familiarize themselves with the mechanisms of a world economy based on the rapid circulation of capital, Edward LiPuma and Benjamin Lee offer a concise introduction to financial derivatives.

    LiPuma and Lee explain how derivatives are essentially wagers—often on the fluctuations of national currencies—based on models that aggregate and price risk. They describe how these financial instruments are changing the face of capitalism, undermining the power of nations and perpetrating a new and less visible form of domination on postcolonial societies. As they ask: How does one know about, let alone demonstrate against, an unlisted, virtual, offshore corporation that operates in an unregulated electronic space using a secret proprietary trading strategy to buy and sell arcane financial instruments? LiPuma and Lee provide a necessary look at the obscure but consequential role of financial derivatives in the global economy.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822386124
    Publication Date: 2004-09-08
    author-list-text: Benjamin Lee, Edward LiPuma, Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar, Jane Kramer and Michael Warner
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Benjamin Lee,
    2. Edward LiPuma,
    3. Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar,
    4. Jane Kramer and
    5. Michael Warner
    contrib-author: Benjamin Lee; Edward LiPuma
    contrib-series-editor: Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar; Jane Kramer; Michael Warner
    copyright-year: 2004
    eisbn: 9780822386124
    isbn-cloth: 9780822334071
    isbn-paper: 9780822334187
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Public planet books
    short-abstract:

    Cultural studies exploration of the implications of the circulation of increasingly abstract forms of capital in the contemporary global economy.

    subtitle:
  • Financial Missionaries to the World
    Author(s): Rosenberg, Emily S.; Joseph, Gilbert M.
    Abstract:

    Winner of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Robert H. Ferrell Book Prize

    Financial Missionaries to the World establishes the broad scope and significance of "dollar diplomacy"—the use of international lending and advising—to early-twentieth-century U.S. foreign policy. Combining diplomatic, economic, and cultural history, the distinguished historian Emily S. Rosenberg shows how private bank loans were extended to leverage the acceptance of American financial advisers by foreign governments. In an analysis striking in its relevance to contemporary debates over international loans, she reveals how a practice initially justified as a progressive means to extend “civilization” by promoting economic stability and progress became embroiled in controversy. Vocal critics at home and abroad charged that American loans and financial oversight constituted a new imperialism that fostered exploitation of less powerful nations. By the mid-1920s, Rosenberg explains, even early supporters of dollar diplomacy worried that by facilitating excessive borrowing, the practice might induce the very instability and default that it supposedly worked against.

    "[A] major and superb contribution to the history of U.S. foreign relations. . . . [Emily S. Rosenberg] has opened up a whole new research field in international history."—Anders Stephanson, Journal of American History

    "[A] landmark in the historiography of American foreign relations."—Melvyn P. Leffler, author of A Preponderence of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration, and the Cold War

    "Fascinating."—Christopher Clark, Times Literary Supplement

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822385233
    Publication Date: 2003-12-12
    author-list-text: Emily S. Rosenberg and Gilbert M. Joseph
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Emily S. Rosenberg and
    2. Gilbert M. Joseph
    contrib-author: Emily S. Rosenberg
    contrib-series-editor: Gilbert M. Joseph
    copyright-year: 2003
    eisbn: 9780822385233
    isbn-paper: 9780822332190
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: American Encounters/Global Interactions
    short-abstract:

    The history of “dollar diplomacy,” using US financial clout to influence the actions of foreign governments.

    subtitle: The Politics and Culture of Dollar Diplomacy, 1900–1930
  • Finding the Movement
    Author(s): Enke, A. Finn; Walkowitz, Daniel J.
    Abstract:

    In Finding the Movement, Anne Enke reveals that diverse women’s engagement with public spaces gave rise to and profoundly shaped second-wave feminism. Focusing on women’s activism in Detroit, Chicago, and Minneapolis-St. Paul during the 1960s and 1970s, Enke describes how women across race and class created a massive groundswell of feminist activism by directly intervening in the urban landscape. They secured illicit meeting spaces and gained access to public athletic fields. They fought to open bars to women and abolish gendered dress codes and prohibitions against lesbian congregation. They created alternative spaces, such as coffeehouses, where women could socialize and organize. They opened women-oriented bookstores, restaurants, cafes, and clubs, and they took it upon themselves to establish women’s shelters, health clinics, and credit unions in order to support women’s bodily autonomy.

    By considering the development of feminism through an analysis of public space, Enke expands and revises the historiography of second-wave feminism. She suggests that the movement was so widespread because it was built by people who did not identify themselves as feminists as well as by those who did. Her focus on claims to public space helps to explain why sexuality, lesbianism, and gender expression were so central to feminist activism. Her spatial analysis also sheds light on hierarchies within the movement. As women turned commercial, civic, and institutional spaces into sites of activism, they produced, as well as resisted, exclusionary dynamics.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822390381
    Publication Date: 2007-10-17
    author-list-text: A. Finn Enke and Daniel J. Walkowitz
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. A. Finn Enke and
    2. Daniel J. Walkowitz
    contrib-author: A. Finn Enke
    contrib-series-editor: Daniel J. Walkowitz
    copyright-year: 2007
    eisbn: 9780822390381
    illustrations-note: 5 maps
    isbn-cloth: 9780822340621
    isbn-paper: 9780822340836
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Radical Perspectives
    short-abstract:

    An analysis of the role public spaces—parks, clubs, book stores—played in shaping the feminist movement in three Midwestern cities during the 1960s and 1970s.

    subtitle: Sexuality, Contested Space, and Feminist Activism
  • Finite Media
    Author(s): Cubitt, Sean
    Abstract:

    While digital media give us the ability to communicate with and know the world, their use comes at the expense of an immense ecological footprint and environmental degradation. In Finite Media Sean Cubitt offers a large-scale rethinking of theories of mediation by examining the environmental and human toll exacted by mining and the manufacture, use, and disposal of millions of phones, computers, and other devices. The way out is through an eco-political media aesthetics, in which people use media to shift their relationship to the environment and where public goods and spaces are available to all. Cubitt demonstrates this through case studies ranging from the 1906 film The Story of the Kelly Gang to an image of Saturn taken during NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission, suggesting that affective responses to images may generate a populist environmental politics that demands better ways of living and being. Only by reorienting our use of media, Cubitt contends, can we overcome the failures of political elites and the ravages of capital.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822373476
    Publication Date: 2016-12-09
    author-list-text: Sean Cubitt
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Sean Cubitt
    contrib-author: Sean Cubitt
    copyright-year: 2017
    eisbn: 9780822373476
    illustrations-note: 2 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822362814
    isbn-paper: 9780822362920
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: a Cultural Politics Book
    short-abstract:

    Sean Cubitt offers a large scale rethinking of theories of mediation by describing the ecological footprint of media. He investigates the energy, material, and space needed to create, operate, and dispose of electronic devices, and shows how changing how we use media is the only solution to planetary devastation.

    subtitle: Environmental Implications of Digital Technologies
  • Fixin to Git
    Author(s): Wright, Jim
    Abstract:

    In the past twenty years, big-time stock-car racing has become America’s fastest growing spectator sport. Winston Cup races draw larger audiences—at the tracks and on television—than any other sport, and drivers like Dale Jarrett, Jeff Gordon, and Mark Martin have become cultural icons whose endorsements command millions. What accounts for NASCAR’s surging popularity?

    For years a “closeted” NASCAR fan, Professor Jim Wright took advantage of a sabbatical in 1999 to attend stock-car races at seven of the Winston Cup’s legendary venues: Daytona, Indianapolis, Darlington, Charlotte, Richmond, Atlanta, and Talladega. The “Fixin’ to Git Road Tour” resulted in this book—not just a travelogue of Wright’s year at the races, but a fan’s valentine to the spectacle, the pageantry, and the subculture of Winston Cup racing.

    Wright busts the myth that NASCAR is a Southern sport and takes on critics who claim that there’s nothing to racing but “drive fast, turn left,” revealing the skill, mental acuity, and physical stamina required by drivers and their crews. Mostly, though, he captures the experience of loyal NASCAR fans like himself, describing the drama in the grandstands—and in the bars, restaurants, parking lots, juke joints, motels, and campgrounds where race fans congregate. He conveys the rich, erotic sensory overload—the sights, the sounds, the smells, the feel—of weekends at the Winston Cup race tracks.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822385363
    Publication Date: 2002-07-25
    author-list-text: Jim Wright
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Jim Wright
    contrib-author: Jim Wright
    copyright-year: 2002
    eisbn: 9780822385363
    illustrations-note: 31 b&w photos, 7 tables, 17 figures
    isbn-cloth: 9780822329268
    isbn-paper: 9780822332206
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    A sociologist writing for a general audience challenges myths about NASCAR racing, considers the significance of its rise in popularity, and analyzes issues of gender, region, ethnicity, and social class in stock car racing.

    subtitle: One Fan’s Love Affair with NASCAR’s Winston Cup
  • Fixing Sex
    Author(s): Karkazis, Katrina
    Abstract:

    What happens when a baby is born with “ambiguous” genitalia or a combination of “male” and “female” body parts? Clinicians and parents in these situations are confronted with complicated questions such as whether a girl can have XY chromosomes, or whether some penises are “too small” for a male sex assignment. Since the 1950s, standard treatment has involved determining a sex for these infants and performing surgery to normalize the infant’s genitalia. Over the past decade intersex advocates have mounted unprecedented challenges to treatment, offering alternative perspectives about the meaning and appropriate medical response to intersexuality and driving the field of those who treat intersex conditions into a deep crisis. Katrina Karkazis offers a nuanced, compassionate picture of these charged issues in Fixing Sex, the first book to examine contemporary controversies over the medical management of intersexuality in the United States from the multiple perspectives of those most intimately involved.

    Drawing extensively on interviews with adults with intersex conditions, parents, and physicians, Karkazis moves beyond the heated rhetoric to reveal the complex reality of how intersexuality is understood, treated, and experienced today. As she unravels the historical, technological, social, and political forces that have culminated in debates surrounding intersexuality, Karkazis exposes the contentious disagreements among theorists, physicians, intersex adults, activists, and parents—and all that those debates imply about gender and the changing landscape of intersex management. She argues that by viewing intersexuality exclusively through a narrow medical lens we avoid much more difficult questions. Do gender atypical bodies require treatment? Should physicians intervene to control the “sex” of the body? As this illuminating book reveals, debates over treatment for intersexuality force reassessment of the seemingly natural connections between gender, biology, and the body.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822389217
    Publication Date: 2008-10-21
    author-list-text: Katrina Karkazis
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Katrina Karkazis
    contrib-author: Katrina Karkazis
    copyright-year: 2008
    eisbn: 9780822389217
    illustrations-note: 1 table
    isbn-cloth: 9780822343028
    isbn-paper: 9780822343189
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    A history about infants that are born intersex--with a combination of "male" and "female" chromosomal, gonadal, and genital characteristics--and how these cases are managed and treated within the United States from 1955 to the present.

    subtitle: Intersex, Medical Authority, and Lived Experience
  • Flame Wars
    Author(s): Dery, Mark
    Abstract:

    "Flame Wars," the verbal firefights that take place between disembodied combatants on electronic bulletin boards, remind us that our interaction with the world is increasingly mediated by computers. Bit by digital bit we are being "Borged," as devotees of Star Trek: The Next Generation would have it—transformed into cyborgian hybrids of technology and biology through our ever more frequent interaction with machines, or with one another through technological interfaces.

    The subcultural practices of the "incurably informed," to borrow the cyberpunk novelist Pat Cadigan’s coinage, offer a precognitive glimpse of mainstream culture in the near future, when many of us will be part-time residents in virtual communities. Yet, as the essays in this expanded edition of a special issue of the South Atlantic Quarterly confirm, there is more to fringe computer culture than cyberspace. Within these pages, readers will encounter flame warriors; new age mutant ninja hackers; technopagans for whom the computer is an occult engine; and William Gibson’s "Agrippa," a short story on software that can only be read once because it gobbles itself up as soon as the last page is reached. Here, too, is Lady El, an African American cleaning woman reincarnated as an all-powerful cyborg; devotees of on-line swinging, or "compu-sex"; the teleoperated weaponry and amok robots of the mechanical performance art group, Survival Research Laboratories; an interview with Samuel Delany, and more.

    Rallying around Fredric Jameson’s call for a cognitive cartography that "seeks to endow the individual subject with some new heightened sense of place in the global system," the contributors to Flame Wars have sketched a corner of that map, an outline for a wiring diagram of a terminally wired world.

    Contributors. Anne Balsamo, Gareth Branwyn, Scott Bukatman, Pat Cadigan, Gary Chapman, Erik Davis, Manuel De Landa, Mark Dery, Julian Dibbell, Marc Laidlaw, Mark Pauline, Peter Schwenger, Vivian Sobchack, Claudia Springer

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822396765
    Publication Date: 2012-06-01
    contrib-editor: Mark Dery
    copyright-year: 1994
    eisbn: 9780822396765
    illustrations-note: 12 b&w photographs, 4 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822315315
    isbn-paper: 9780822315407
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    subtitle: The Discourse of Cyberculture
  • Fluent Bodies
    Author(s): Langford, Jean M.
    Abstract:

    Fluent Bodies examines the modernization of the indigenous healing practice, Ayurveda, in India. Combining contemporary ethnography with a study of key historical moments as glimpsed through early-twentieth-century texts, Jean M. Langford argues that as Ayurveda evolved from an eclectic set of healing practices into a sign of Indian national culture, it was reimagined as a healing force not simply for bodily disorders but for colonial and postcolonial ills.

    Interweaving theory with narrative, Langford explores the strategies of contemporary practitioners who reconfigure Ayurvedic knowledge through institutions and technologies such as hospitals, anatomy labs, clinical trials, and sonograms. She shows how practitioners appropriate, transform, or circumvent the knowledge practices implicit in these institutions and technologies, destabilizing such categories as medicine, culture, science, symptom, and self, even as they deploy them in clinical practice. Ultimately, this study points to the future of Ayurveda in a transnational era as a remedy not only for the wounds of colonialism but also for an imagined cultural emptiness at the heart of global modernity.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822384113
    Publication Date: 2012-06-01
    author-list-text: Jean M. Langford
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Jean M. Langford
    contrib-author: Jean M. Langford
    copyright-year: 2002
    eisbn: 9780822384113
    illustrations-note: 16 illus., 1 table
    isbn-cloth: 9780822329312
    isbn-paper: 9780822329480
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Body, commodity, text
    subtitle: Ayurvedic Remedies for Postcolonial Imbalance
  • Fluid New York
    Author(s): Joseph, May
    Abstract:

    Hurricane Sandy was a fierce demonstration of the ecological vulnerability of New York, a city of islands. Yet the storm also revealed the resilience of a metropolis that has started during the past decade to reckon with its aqueous topography. In Fluid New York, May Joseph describes the many ways that New York, and New Yorkers, have begun to incorporate the city's archipelago ecology into plans for a livable and sustainable future. For instance, by cleaning its tidal marshes, the municipality has turned a previously dilapidated waterfront into a space for public leisure and rejuvenation.

    Joseph considers New York's relation to the water that surrounds and defines it. Her reflections reach back to the city's heyday as a world-class port—a past embodied in a Dutch East India Company cannon recently unearthed from the rubble at the World Trade Center site—and they encompass the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. They suggest that New York's future lies in the reclamation of its great water resources—for artistic creativity, civic engagement, and ecological sustainability.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822378884
    Publication Date: 2013-06-10
    author-list-text: May Joseph
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. May Joseph
    contrib-author: May Joseph
    copyright-year: 2013
    eisbn: 9780822378884
    illustrations-note: 3 illustrations, 5 maps
    isbn-cloth: 9780822354604
    isbn-paper: 9780822354727
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Fluid New York offers reflections on how New York began to incorporate the city's archipelago ecology into plans for a livable and sustainable future in the decade between September 11 and Hurricane Sandy.

    subtitle: Cosmopolitan Urbanism and the Green Imagination
  • Flyboy 2
    Author(s): Tate, Greg
    Abstract:

    Since launching his career at the Village Voice in the early 1980s Greg Tate has been one of the premiere critical voices on contemporary Black music, art, literature, film, and politics. Flyboy 2 provides a panoramic view of the past thirty years of Tate's influential work. Whether interviewing Miles Davis or Ice Cube, reviewing an Azealia Banks mixtape or Suzan-Lori Parks's Topdog/Underdog, discussing visual artist Kara Walker or writer Clarence Major, or analyzing the ties between Afro-futurism, Black feminism, and social movements, Tate's resounding critical insights illustrate how race, gender, and class become manifest in American popular culture. Above all, Tate demonstrates through his signature mix of vernacular poetics and cultural theory and criticism why visionary Black artists, intellectuals, aesthetics, philosophies, and politics matter to twenty-first-century America. 

     

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822373995
    Publication Date: 2016-07-15
    author-list-text: Greg Tate
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Greg Tate
    contrib-author: Greg Tate
    copyright-year: 2016
    eisbn: 9780822373995
    isbn-cloth: 9780822361800
    isbn-paper: 9780822361961
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    Flyboy 2 provides a panoramic view of the last thirty years of Greg Tate's influential cultural criticism of contemporary Black music, art, literature, film, and politics. These essays, interviews, and reviews cover everything from Miles Davis, Ice Cube, and Suzan Lori Parks to Afro-futurism, Kara Walker, and Amiri Baraka.

    subtitle: The Greg Tate Reader
  • Flying Saucers Rock 'n' Roll
    Author(s): Austen, Jake
    Abstract:

    For nearly twenty years, the much-beloved music magazine Roctober has featured work by some of the best underground cartoonists, exhaustive examinations of made-up genres such as “robot rock,” and an ongoing exploration of everything Sammy Davis Jr. ever sang, said, or did. But the heart of the magazine has always been the lengthy conversations with overlooked or forgotten artists. Flying Saucers Rock ’n’ Roll gathers the most compelling of these interviews. Eccentric, important artists—including the rockabilly icon Billy Lee Riley, the jazz musician and activist Oscar Brown Jr., the “Outlaw Country” singer David Allan Coe, and the pioneer rock ’n’ roll group the Treniers—give the most in-depth interviews of their lengthy careers. Obscure musicians, such as the Armenian-language novelty artist Guy Chookoorian and the frustrated interstellar glam act Zolar X, reveal fascinating lives lived at rock’s margins. Roctober’s legendarily dedicated writers convey telling anecdotes in the fervent, captivating prose that has long been appreciated by music enthusiasts. Along with the entertaining interviews, Flying Saucers Rock ’n’ Roll features more than sixty images from the pages of Roctober and ten illustrations created for the book by the underground rock ’n’ roll artist King Merinuk.

    Contributors

    Steve Albini

    Ben Austen

    Jake Austen

    John Battles

    Bosco

    Ken Burke

    Mike Maltese

    King Merinuk

    Ken Mottet

    Jonathan Poletti

    James Porter

    "Colonel" Dan Sorenson

    Jacqueline Stewart

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822393375
    Publication Date: 2011-08-10
    contrib-editor: Jake Austen
    copyright-year: 2011
    eisbn: 9780822393375
    illustrations-note: 74 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822348375
    isbn-paper: 9780822348498
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Refiguring American music
    short-abstract:

    The best of the cult-favorite music magazine Roctober s conversations with overlooked or forgotten artists, from the Outlaw Country singer David Allan Coe to the frustrated interstellar glam act Zolar X.

    subtitle: Conversations with Unjustly Obscure Rock 'n' Soul Eccentrics
  • Food, Farms, and Solidarity
    Author(s): Heller, Chaia
    Abstract:

    The Confédération Paysanne, one of France's largest farmers' unions, has successfully fought against genetically modified organisms (GMOs), but unlike other allied movements, theirs has been led by producers rather than consumers. In Food, Farms, and Solidarity, Chaia Heller analyzes the group's complex strategies and campaigns, including a call for a Europe-wide ban on GM crops and hormone-treated beef, and a protest staged at a McDonald's. Her study of the Confédération Paysanne shows the challenges small farms face in a postindustrial agricultural world. Heller also reveals how the language the union uses to argue against GMOs encompasses more than the risks they pose; emphasizing solidarity has allowed farmers to focus on food as a cultural practice and align themselves with other workers. Heller's examination of the Confédération Paysanne's commitment to a vision of alter-globalization, the idea of substantive alternatives to neoliberal globalization, demonstrates how ecological and social justice can be restored in the world.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822394808
    Publication Date: 2012-12-15
    author-list-text: Chaia Heller
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Chaia Heller
    contrib-author: Chaia Heller
    copyright-year: 2012
    eisbn: 9780822394808
    isbn-cloth: 9780822351184
    isbn-paper: 9780822351276
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: New ecologies for the twenty-first century
    short-abstract:

    Chaia Heller follows one of France's largest farmers' unions as it joins with peasants internationally to contest the hegemony of genetically modified foods, free trade, and industrial agriculture.

    subtitle: French Farmers Challenge Industrial Agriculture and Genetically Modified Crops
  • For the City Yet to Come
    Author(s): Simone, AbdouMaliq
    Abstract:

    Among government officials, urban planners, and development workers, Africa’s burgeoning metropolises are frequently understood as failed cities, unable to provide even basic services. Whatever resourcefulness does exist is regarded as only temporary compensation for fundamental failure. In For the City Yet to Come, AbdouMaliq Simone argues that by overlooking all that does work in Africa’s cities, this perspective forecloses opportunities to capitalize on existing informal economies and structures in development efforts within Africa and to apply lessons drawn from them to rapidly growing urban areas around the world. Simone contends that Africa’s cities do work on some level and to the extent that they do, they function largely through fluid, makeshift collective actions running parallel to proliferating decentralized local authorities, small-scale enterprises, and community associations.

    Drawing on his nearly fifteen years of work in African cities—as an activist, teacher, development worker, researcher, and advisor to ngos and local governments—Simone provides a series of case studies illuminating the provisional networks through which most of Africa’s urban dwellers procure basic goods and services. He examines informal economies and social networks in Pikine, a large suburb of Dakar, Senegal; in Winterveld, a neighborhood on the edge of Pretoria, South Africa; in Douala, Cameroon; and among Africans seeking work in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He contextualizes these particular cases through an analysis of the broad social, economic, and historical conditions that created present-day urban Africa. For the City Yet to Come is a powerful argument that any serious attempt to reinvent African urban centers must acknowledge the particular history of these cities and incorporate the local knowledge reflected in already existing informal urban economic and social systems.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822386247
    Publication Date: 2004-09-16
    author-list-text: AbdouMaliq Simone
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. AbdouMaliq Simone
    contrib-author: AbdouMaliq Simone
    copyright-year: 2004
    eisbn: 9780822386247
    illustrations-note: 5 illus.
    isbn-cloth: 9780822334347
    isbn-paper: 9780822334453
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    short-abstract:

    A study of how colonial and postcolonial legacies manifest in African cities and African urban planning.

    subtitle: Changing African Life in Four Cities
  • For the Record
    Author(s): Arondekar, Anjali; Grewal, Inderpal; Kaplan, Caren; Wiegman, Robyn
    Abstract:

    Anjali Arondekar considers the relationship between sexuality and the colonial archive by posing the following questions: Why does sexuality (still) seek its truth in the historical archive? What are the spatial and temporal logics that compel such a return? And conversely, what kind of “archive” does such a recuperative hermeneutics produce? Rather than render sexuality’s relationship to the colonial archive through the preferred lens of historical invisibility (which would presume that there is something about sexuality that is lost or silent and needs to “come out”), Arondekar engages sexuality’s recursive traces within the colonial archive against and through our very desire for access.

    The logic and the interpretive resources of For the Record arise out of two entangled and minoritized historiographies: one in South Asian studies and the other in queer/sexuality studies. Focusing on late colonial India, Arondekar examines the spectacularization of sexuality in anthropology, law, literature, and pornography from 1843 until 1920. By turning to materials and/or locations that are familiar to most scholars of queer and subaltern studies, Arondekar considers sexuality at the center of the colonial archive rather than at its margins. Each chapter addresses a form of archival loss, troped either in a language of disappearance or paucity, simulacrum or detritus: from Richard Burton’s missing report on male brothels in Karáchi (1845) to a failed sodomy prosecution in Northern India, Queen Empress v. Khairati (1884), and from the ubiquitous India-rubber dildos found in colonial pornography of the mid-to-late nineteenth century to the archival detritus of Kipling’s stories about the Indian Mutiny of 1857.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822391029
    Publication Date: 2009-08-25
    author-list-text: Anjali Arondekar, Inderpal Grewal, Caren Kaplan and Robyn Wiegman
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Anjali Arondekar,
    2. Inderpal Grewal,
    3. Caren Kaplan and
    4. Robyn Wiegman
    contrib-author: Anjali Arondekar
    contrib-series-editor: Inderpal Grewal; Caren Kaplan; Robyn Wiegman
    copyright-year: 2009
    eisbn: 9780822391029
    isbn-cloth: 9780822345152
    isbn-paper: 9780822345336
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Next Wave: New Directions in Women's Studies
    short-abstract:

    A study of the colonial state's imposition of regimes of sexuality, as seen through archives of law, literature and pornography.

    subtitle: On Sexuality and the Colonial Archive in India
  • Foreign Front
    Author(s): Slobodian, Quinn
    Abstract:

    It is often asserted that West German New Leftists "discovered the Third World" in the pivotal decade of the 1960s. Quinn Slobodian upsets that storyline by beginning with individuals from the Third World themselves: students from Africa, Asia, and Latin America who arrived on West German campuses in large numbers in the early 1960s. They were the first to mobilize German youth in protest against acts of state violence and injustice perpetrated beyond Europe and North America. The activism of the foreign students served as a model for West German students, catalyzing social movements and influencing modes of opposition to the Vietnam War. In turn, the West Germans offered the international students solidarity and safe spaces for their dissident engagements. This collaboration helped the West German students to develop a more nuanced, empathetic understanding of the Third World, not just as a site of suffering, poverty, and violence, but also as the home of politicized individuals with the capacity and will to speak in their own names.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822395041
    Publication Date: 2012-03-19
    author-list-text: Quinn Slobodian
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Quinn Slobodian
    contrib-author: Quinn Slobodian
    copyright-year: 2012
    eisbn: 9780822395041
    illustrations-note: 24 photographs
    isbn-cloth: 9780822351702
    isbn-paper: 9780822351849
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Radical perspectives
    short-abstract:

    Foreign Front describes the activism that took place in West Germany in the 1960s when more than 10,000 students from Asia, Latin America, and Africa were enrolled in universities there. They served as a spark for local West German students to mobilize and protest the injustices that were occurring wordwide.

    subtitle: Third World Politics in Sixties West Germany
  • Foreign in a Domestic Sense
    Author(s): Burnett, Christina Duffy; Marshall, Burke; Joseph, Gilbert M.; Rosenberg, Emily S.
    Abstract:

    In this groundbreaking study of American imperialism, leading legal scholars address the problem of the U.S. territories. Foreign in a Domestic Sense will redefine the boundaries of constitutional scholarship.

    More than four million U.S. citizens currently live in five “unincorporated” U.S. territories. The inhabitants of these vestiges of an American empire are denied full representation in Congress and cannot vote in presidential elections. Focusing on Puerto Rico, the largest and most populous of the territories, Foreign in a Domestic Sense sheds much-needed light on the United States’ unfinished colonial experiment and its legacy of racially rooted imperialism, while insisting on the centrality of these “marginal” regions in any serious treatment of American constitutional history. For one hundred years, Puerto Ricans have struggled to define their place in a nation that neither wants them nor wants to let them go. They are caught in a debate too politicized to yield meaningful answers. Meanwhile, doubts concerning the constitutionality of keeping colonies have languished on the margins of mainstream scholarship, overlooked by scholars outside the island and ignored by the nation at large.

    This book does more than simply fill a glaring omission in the study of race, cultural identity, and the Constitution; it also makes a crucial contribution to the study of American federalism, serves as a foundation for substantive debate on Puerto Rico’s status, and meets an urgent need for dialogue on territorial status between the mainlandd and the territories.

    Contributors. José Julián Álvarez González, Roberto Aponte Toro, Christina Duffy Burnett, José A. Cabranes, Sanford Levinson, Burke Marshall, Gerald L. Neuman, Angel R. Oquendo, Juan Perea, Efrén Rivera Ramos, Rogers M. Smith, E. Robert Statham Jr., Brook Thomas, Richard Thornburgh, Juan R. Torruella, José Trías Monge, Mark Tushnet, Mark Weiner

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822381167
    Publication Date: 2001-06-29
    author-list-text: Gilbert M. Joseph and Emily S. Rosenberg
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Gilbert M. Joseph and
    2. Emily S. Rosenberg
    contrib-editor: Christina Duffy Burnett; Burke Marshall
    contrib-series-editor: Gilbert M. Joseph; Emily S. Rosenberg
    copyright-year: 2001
    eisbn: 9780822381167
    isbn-cloth: 9780822326892
    isbn-paper: 9780822326984
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: American Encounters/Global Interactions
    short-abstract:

    A number of leading legal scholars address different aspects of the American experience of territorial government in areas unincorporated for reasons of geography and the cultural and racial makeup of their peoples with special emphasis on the status of P

    subtitle: Puerto Rico, American Expansion, and the Constitution
  • Forensic Media
    Author(s): Siegel, Greg
    Abstract:

    In Forensic Media, Greg Siegel considers how photographic, electronic, and digital media have been used to record and reconstruct accidents, particularly high-speed crashes and catastrophes. Focusing in turn on the birth of the field of forensic engineering, Charles Babbage's invention of a "self-registering apparatus" for railroad trains, flight-data and cockpit voice recorders ("black boxes"), the science of automobile crash-testing, and various accident-reconstruction techniques and technologies, Siegel shows how "forensic media" work to transmute disruptive chance occurrences into reassuring narratives of causal succession. Through historical and philosophical analyses, he demonstrates that forensic media are as much technologies of cultural imagination as they are instruments of scientific inscription, as imbued with ideological fantasies as they are compelled by institutional rationales. By rethinking the historical links and cultural relays between accidents and forensics, Siegel sheds new light on the corresponding connections between media, technology, and modernity.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822376231
    Publication Date: 2014-10-13
    author-list-text: Greg Siegel
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Greg Siegel
    contrib-author: Greg Siegel
    copyright-year: 2014
    eisbn: 9780822376231
    illustrations-note: 57 illustrations
    isbn-cloth: 9780822357391
    isbn-paper: 9780822357537
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: Sign, Storage, Transmission
    short-abstract:

    This provocative book considers how photographic, electronic, and digital media have been used to record and reconstruct accidents, particularly high-speed crashes and catastrophes, and argues that “forensic media” thereby transmute disruptive chance occurrences into reassuring narratives of causal succession.

    subtitle: Reconstructing Accidents in Accelerated Modernity
  • Forgotten Readers
    Author(s): McHenry, Elizabeth; Pease, Donald E.
    Abstract:

    Over the past decade the popularity of black writers including E. Lynn Harris and Terry McMillan has been hailed as an indication that an active African American reading public has come into being. Yet this is not a new trend; there is a vibrant history of African American literacy, literary associations, and book clubs. Forgotten Readers reveals that neglected past, looking at the reading practices of free blacks in the antebellum north and among African Americans following the Civil War. It places the black upper and middle classes within American literary history, illustrating how they used reading and literary conversation as a means to assert their civic identities and intervene in the political and literary cultures of the United States from which they were otherwise excluded.

    Forgotten Readers expands our definition of literacy and urges us to think of literature as broadly as it was conceived of in the nineteenth century. Elizabeth McHenry delves into archival sources, including the records of past literary societies and the unpublished writings of their members. She examines particular literary associations, including the Saturday Nighters of Washington, D.C., whose members included Jean Toomer and Georgia Douglas Johnson. She shows how black literary societies developed, their relationship to the black press, and the ways that African American women’s clubs—which flourished during the 1890s—encouraged literary activity. In an epilogue, McHenry connects this rich tradition of African American interest in books, reading, and literary conversation to contemporary literary phenomena such as Oprah Winfrey’s book club.

    DOI: 10.1215/9780822384144
    Publication Date: 2002-10-10
    author-list-text: Elizabeth McHenry and Donald E. Pease
    author-list-xhtml:
    1. Elizabeth McHenry and
    2. Donald E. Pease
    contrib-author: Elizabeth McHenry
    contrib-series-editor: Donald E. Pease
    copyright-year: 2002
    eisbn: 9780822384144
    illustrations-note: 4 b&w photos
    isbn-cloth: 9780822329800
    isbn-paper: 9780822329954
    publisher-name: Duke University Press
    series: a John Hope Franklin Center Book
    short-abstract:

    Recovers the history of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century African American reading societies.

    subtitle: Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies

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